If a woman has a sex change operation and becomes a man, can she still get breast cancer?

Possibly. I would imagine risk is much lower because of the mastectomies and removal of ovaries, depending on stage of transformation.
Breast ca. Yes. Both men and women get breast cancer. The shutting off of the ovaries will decrease the estrogen production but the testosterone shots have their own issues. Regardless, the risk is still there.

Related Questions

If a man has breast cancer at 60 does he get plastic surgery on the other side also?

He can. Regardless of sex or age, anyone who is left with a cosmetic deformity after any cancer operation can be offered the option of reconstructive surgery. The few men that I have treated for breast cancer have not desired any reconstructive procedure for either the affected or unaffected side, but this is an individual decision. Read more...
Yes. Most do not opt for that or need it - that is mastopexy but they will cover it. Read more...
Male breast cancer. A patient with breast cancer can have plastic surgery to reconstruct the breasts regardless of gender or age insofar as their is no medical contraindication not to perform such surgery. This includes cancer on the breast without cancer to achieve symmetry. Read more...
Breast Cancer. So this question reflects on the language of the 1998 women's health rights act which mandates the private insurance companies cover the cost of breast reconstruction after mastectomy as well as symmetry procedures on the opposite breast. It doesn't cover males and it doesn't cover lumpectomy reconstruction. There are currently multiple pieces of legislation to help make up for these shortcomings. Read more...

What options do I have for construction after breast cancer removal surgery? I am a woman in my mid 30s diagnosed with left breast cancer and treated with total removal of my left breast. What options do I have for symmetry again? How many operations do w

I . I am a breast augmentation expert but not a breast reconstruction expert. You, of course, realize that you might have the option of an implant (may require initial tissue expansion) or of a tissue flap. One issue that you should consider is fat transfer. I know that least one sub-specialized microvascular reconstruction expert that only uses fat transfer - he has abandoned his previous surgical training. One doctor that is a fat transfer expert is mario diana in san antonio. Goodluck! Read more...
The . The most common procedure is to place a tissue expander on the side of the mastectomy.The tissue is then expanded to equal the other side.Soemtimes the other side may sag or droop and we do a breast lift to create symmetry and on occasion we also augment that side as well.There are a lot of optionsavailable and insurance will pay for this. Read more...
Very . Very hard over the internet to offer the correct options in reconstruction and contralateral surgery for the breast symmetry. Options include; tissue expander, lats flap from back, tram flap, microsurgery flap, newest option is fat grafts. For the other breast and reduction, implant, or lift. If you like call my office to set up an appointment 305 598 0091 regards dr, b. Read more...
Mastectomy. What you are describing would involve a delayed breast reconstruction since it is after the mastectomy has been performed it it has been allowed to heal. From description I do not know whether or not you had radiation treatment after your mastectomy. If you had radiation treatment then i recommend your own tissue through the use of flap surgery or fat grafting. Expander if no radiation in past! Read more...

Can the mammography test discover the breast cancer even if the woman had a breast enlargement surgery (silicon)?

See below. It can still be used but it's predictability can be compromised, depending on the surgery. Read more...
Yes. Mammogram i still the best means to identify early breast cancer. A breast implant can make mammograms more difficult to interpret and likely will require special or additional mammogram views for the radiologist to see what they need to. Read more...
Yes. Yearly mammography should be obtained beginning at age 40 whether a woman has implants or not. The standard examination adds two additional images which "push back" the implants so that nearly all of the breast is imaged. I have detected many small breast cancers easily on mammograms which could then be biopsied by a needle without jeopardizing the implant. Read more...

Does transgender (female to male) and has surgery to remove the breasts and lymph nodes reduce the risk of breast cancer?

Probably. In general, transgender surgery does not remove your lymph nodes... Just the breasts. A cosmetic, non-cancer, operation for the breasts can occasionally leave some breast tissue. This may leave you with some risk of breast cancer, but this is probably much less than 5%. Everything still depends on your underlying risk of breast cancer, which may depend on your family history and other factors.. Read more...

If a transgender (female to male) had surgery to remove the breasts and lymph nodes, would this reduce the risk of breast cancer?

You would think so. But actually not proven. Also, i doubt that the lymph nodes were removed. Read more...
Yes. A mastectomy does reduce the risk of breast cancer. It certainly is not completely gone but it definitely helps. Read more...

Age 40, female, breast cancer. Mri report b4 surgery states: please correlate clinically for any abnormality with right side port. What does this mean?

It means. Need additional evaluation , decision by your doctor , as result you already had biopsy . Now tell us the good new about your biopsy report . All diagnostic tests are great but ultimate final diagnosis is by biopsy only , which you had, good luck. Read more...
Not sure. If you had the port placed before the MRI they may be seeing post operative effects and using a "cover their ass" reading of a possible right sided lesion. If the cancer is in the left as i suspect this is probably nothing to worry about. Mention it to your surgeon though for peace of mind. Read more...

My friend has recently had breast reconstruction surgery after breast cancer and she was wondering if it is possible to still breast feed?

Depends on variables. The original surgery or the reconstruction may or may not have interfered with the internal structures needed to make or transfer milk from the glands forward to the nipple, If so, breast feeding would not be possible. If they did not, it might be.The surgeons involved might be able to answer the question with more reliability. Read more...
Depends. If she and a mastectomy, most (97%) of her breast tissue was removed and she won't be able to breastfeed on that side, even if she had reconstruction. Breast reconstruction uses an implant or the patient's own tissue (flap) to replace the tissue removed by mastectomy. However, the reconstructed breast cannot produce milk. If she kept her other breast, she will be able to breastfeed on that side. Read more...