What sorts of things make a person have a higher risk of getting a femoral hernia?

Overexertion. Femoral hernias are typically congenital, meaning that one is born with the defect leading to the hernia. However, prolonged exertion or stresses such as obesity may increase the probability of these growing to the point where they become evident.
Genetics. Most people that perform strenuous activity for a living or who are obese do not have femoral hernias. In fact, many o the patients I have treated for this over the years have been sedentary and thin. There are many unknown factors that cause a groin hernia of any type, and genetics is one if those factors. In other words, you shouldn't limit activity for fear if developing a femoral hernia.

Related Questions

A lot of pain had CT scan no recurrent femoral hernia had a trig. Point injection caused pain to get worse doctor wants to go in what could it be?

Scar tissue. Most likely scar tissue entrapped the nerve causing your pain , unfortunately this annoying problem do occurs rarely, with time and some physical therapy will alleviate in most of the cases. Very rarely need exploration, of the area neurolysis or freeing the trapped nerve , will help speak to your surgeon good luck. Read more...

What are some early signs I'm getting a femoral hernia?

Groin pain or bulge. The earliest signs of a femoral hernia include a subtle lump or bulge in the groin crease, occasionally accompanied by pain, especially with exertion. Read more...
Bulge and pain. Femoral hernias are uncommon in males, most common in females from 30 to 60 years old, a bulge below the groin and pain in the area are the most common signs and symptoms. Femoral hernias are difficult to diagnose and require a skilled surgeon to confirm. A ct is diagnostic in these cases. Read more...

After my femoral hernia repair, what sorts of activities are okay?

Few restrictions. Following femoral hernia surgery i advise my patients to avoid strenuous activity for 1-2 weeks. Most people are back to full activities without restrictions within 3-4 weeks. Some factors that may affect recovery include patient age, size of hernia, coexisting medical problems, and hernia repair technique (laparoscopic vs. Open). Read more...
Should be all. After repair of a femoral hernia, it would depend on the technique. Regardless of the technique however there shouldn't be any long-term restrictions on any activity. I usually telling patients to return to normal activity as tolerated. Check with your surgeon however to make sure. Read more...