What is non-small cell lung cancer?

See below. Non-small cell lung cancer is a type of lung cancer that grows more slowly and can be operated on if diagnosed at an early stage. It generally has a better prognosis than small-cell lung cancer, but that is depending on the stage and comorbidities.
Formerly, NSCLC . (sq & adeno) were treated with surgery, no chemo. Small cell was almost never treated with surgery and always chemotherapy. Now, chemotherapy is used in both. Once mediastinal nodes are +, chemo+rt is the standard, but many try to use surgery, especially if a lobectomy can be done. All are linked to smoking/tobacco.
One type . There are two broad categories of primary lung cancer called small cell and non small cell. Simply put, small cell is more aggressive, harder to treat and less common. Non small cell acts differently, can be treated with surgery and is the common smokers lung cancer.

Related Questions

Could you explain what is non small cell lung cancer?

One type of lung. Cancer. It is not easy to explain. There are multiple subtypes within in this type. These are due to smoking and tend to spread locally as compared to early spread through blood for small cell cancer. See this site for more info. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/non-small-cell-lung/patient/page1. Read more...
Classification. Lung cancer can be classified into two broad classes: small cell and non- small cell. Since small cell is almost always non- surgical, it is important to make the distinction. Non- small cell can include squamous cell, adenocarcinoma, large cell, neuroendocrine, broncho-alveolar, etc. Read more...

What's the prognosis for non small cell lung cancer?

5yr suvival bystage . Ia = 49% ib = 45% iia = 30% iib = 31% iiia = 14% iiib = 5% iv = 1% http://www.Cancer.Org/cancer/lungcancer-non-smallcell/detailedguide/non-small-cell-lung-cancer-survival-rates. Read more...
Stage. As noted by other physician, there are statistical based survival estimates by stage. But, each patient is an individual. It is most critical to speak with your cancer team. They will develop multi-disciplan approach and treatment plan and have a more personalized/individualized determination of reasonable prognosis. Read more...
See below. No way to say based on the your question. We would need to know what stage, molecular markers, what type, etc. Read more...

What's the difference between non-small cell lung cancer and small-cell?

Entirely different. Different types of cancer. Small cell multiplies fast and is considered spread at the time of diagnosis. Because of that, it may also respond better to chemotherapy. Non-small-cell grows more slowly and if found in an early stage, may be curative by surgery. Read more...
See below. Small cell is much more rapidly growing and more likely to be responsive to chemotherapy than non-small cell. Small cell is seldom amenable to surgery since it's almost always widespread at the time of diagnosis. Without treatment small cell cancer kills within 6 weeks or so while non-small cell cancer usually takes a year or two or more to get that bad. Read more...

What are the tests for non-small cell lung cancer?

Work Up. Includes: ct-chest thru liver and adrenals, head ct+/- contrast or mr, bone scan. Pet scan depends on ct findings, proximity of primary to medistinum. Read more...
Nsclc. First of all, a biopsy will need to be done to the lung mass/nodule not only to establish diagnosis but also to find the histology and genetic profile of the cancer. Then, complete staging work-up with pet/ ct scan need to be done to stage the cancer. The treatment will depend on the histology/molecular-genetic mutation status, stage, as well as overall condition and preference of a patient. Read more...
A few. Ct scan and pet scan are sensitive radiographic test. Percutaneous biopsy can provide a diagnosis. In some high risk patients with suspicious radiographs going straight to surgical resection is reasonable. Read more...

What is the survival percentage non small cell lung cancer?

The survival for. All lung cancer is about 14%. A useless figure. You need to know size, nodal involvement, resectability. The percentage rises as you select. But it still is only 80% with resection and small squamous cancers. Read more...
The stage and others. Will depend on the stage and other prognostic factors. In general, the 5 year overall survival for stage 1 is 60-80%., stage 2 is 40-50%; stage 3 is 10-23%, and stage 4 is less than 10%. These however are the statistics obtained when using regular cytotoxic chemotherapy. With more personalized and more targetted therapy-we are hoping the number will improve. Read more...
Stage dependent. Each patient and each case is individual. Key to good cancer care is a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach. If indicated, surgical resection should be performed by a thoracic surgeon. Here is generalized statistical estimate by stage: http://goo.Gl/2cdq9. Read more...

What is surgery like for non small cell lung cancer?

Often cures. Surgery is the standard of care for stage i and ii lung cancer in the physically fit patient, and should be considered as an option in many patients with stage iiia. Often can be done minimally invasively thorascopically or with a robot. Recovery varies with the level of invasiveness. Lung surgery has best outcomes by a board certified thoracic surgeon. Read more...
See below. Depending on where the cancer is and how big, it may require resection of a lobe (part of the lung) or the whole lung. Many surgeons may do this thoracoscopically if feasible, which is less invasive and allows for a faster recovery. Generally, patients spend several days in the hospital with chest tubes, which are painful, and recover over the next 3 months or so if there are no complications. Read more...

Is non-small cell lung cancer often a non-smokers cancer?

Yes. The two variants of lung cancer that are non small cell (neuroendocrine) in origin are squamous and adenoCa of the lung. In the last decade, the squamous variant has taken a back seat and adenoCa unrelated to smoking has occupied more than 70% of the cases. The probable cause is a viral factor. Read more...
Yes. There are several types of non-small cell lung cancer. Typically squamous cell is associated with smoking. Adenocarcinoma isn't usually related to smoking. Read more...

What are the surgical options for non-small cell lung cancer?

Surgery for NSCLC. Curative surgery for lung cancer is based currently on lobectomy, or removing the entire lobe (1/5 of the lung), and rarely pneumonectomy, or removing an entire lung on one side. Lobectomy is traditionally done via a thoracotomy (-cotomy meaning cut, or cut the thorax or chest). Now there are minimally invasive approaches. This is called video assisted thoracic surgery or vats lobectomy. Read more...
The first question. Should be is there any role for surgery. The techniques are "open" or thoracoscopic directed, originally just video, now robotic as well. The surgeon should know status of n-2 nodes and whether a lobectomy or entire lung is to be removed, and usually nodes are dissected or sampled regardless ot pre-op "knowledge". Segments and wedge done for poor pft. Read more...
Robot or VATS. Optimal lung cancer surgery, in appropriate candidates, is anatomic lobectomy (part of lung) or pneumonectomy (whole lung). Complete lymph node sample or dissection is integral part of case. Traditional centers use thoracotomy as primary approach. Modern minimally invasive approaches include vats and robotic techniques. Optimal lung cancer treatment is by comprehensive multidisciplinary approach. Read more...