7 doctors weighed in:

What makes cancer metastasize?

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Matt Malkin
Anesthesiology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Still unknown really

Basically cancer is mutated cells that stop following the body's rules.
They grow uncontrollably despite signals from their neighbors to stop. They break through natural barriers that most cells respect. Eventually they may reach lymphatic or blood vessels. A few cells then break free and colonize other tissue, like lymph nodes or other organs-metastasize. Each cancer has its own patterns.

In brief: Still unknown really

Basically cancer is mutated cells that stop following the body's rules.
They grow uncontrollably despite signals from their neighbors to stop. They break through natural barriers that most cells respect. Eventually they may reach lymphatic or blood vessels. A few cells then break free and colonize other tissue, like lymph nodes or other organs-metastasize. Each cancer has its own patterns.
Dr. Matt Malkin
Dr. Matt Malkin
Thank
3 doctors agree

In brief: Cell type

Different cancers behave differently.
Some cancers rarely spread, and other spread or metastasize more easily. Some cancer cells can get into the blood stream and spread to to other organs, or can get into the lymph system and spread to lymph nodes. Some cancer cells encourage new blood vessels to grow and feed themselves.

In brief: Cell type

Different cancers behave differently.
Some cancers rarely spread, and other spread or metastasize more easily. Some cancer cells can get into the blood stream and spread to to other organs, or can get into the lymph system and spread to lymph nodes. Some cancer cells encourage new blood vessels to grow and feed themselves.
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
Thank
Dr. Matt Malkin
Anesthesiology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Continued

Cancer research studies apoptosis (cell death) carefully, because cancer cells essentially refuse to self-destruct when told they have uncorrectable errors in their dna.
The error-control mechanisms are very sophisticated. If there are generic defects in these, like p53, brca, and others, then bad cells can multiply and mutate without interference.

In brief: Continued

Cancer research studies apoptosis (cell death) carefully, because cancer cells essentially refuse to self-destruct when told they have uncorrectable errors in their dna.
The error-control mechanisms are very sophisticated. If there are generic defects in these, like p53, brca, and others, then bad cells can multiply and mutate without interference.
Dr. Matt Malkin
Dr. Matt Malkin
Thank
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