How can you get bladder cancer if you're constantly urinating?

In other ways. The development of bladder cancer has little to do with the frequency of urination. It has everything to do with changes to the lining of the bladder, mostly due to exposure to toxins in the urine, such as from cigarette smoke & industrial chemicals. Inherited genetic factors play a role as well. For those that have developed bladder cancer, one of the symptoms can be frequent urination.

Related Questions

If I have bladder cancer, would there be blood in my urine?

Yes. Bladder cancer may cause visible blood in the urine or microscopic blood in the urine which is only picked up by urine tests. Depending on the type of cancer, size, number of lesions, etc, blood may be visible to the naked eye but can also be absent with smaller lesions. Therefore, urine tests must be performed when bladder cancer is suspected. Read more...
Usually. Most patients with bladder cancer will have detectable levels of blood in the urine (hematuria). Sometimes it is visible to the patient while other times it is only seen microscopically. In unusual cases might a person be diagnosed with cancer in the bladder with no hematuria. Read more...

Why is a biopsy more reliable for diagnosing bladder cancer than a urine cytology?

More info in biopsy. Urine cytology examines single cells that are shed from the bladder lining and are suspended in fluid. Nuclear features of each cell can be evaluated but low grade cancer may look similar to reactive changes. A biopsy is a whole piece of tissue. The entire thickness of the lining and overall morphology can be evaluated. A biopsy is far better than urine cytology, especially for low grade lesion. Read more...

Can someone explain to me how come a biopsy is more reliable in diagnosing bladder cancer than a urine cytology?

Both are good. Urine cytology just catches whatever cells have broken off the tumor and ended up in the urine. These cells were usually dead to begin with, or they would not have fallen off. If they were not dead to begin with, they still die once they break off the main tumor. So the pathologist has to try to guess what type of tumor the cell came from, even though it is basically dead and rotten. Read more...
See below. Urine cytology is looking for cancer cells in the urine, which can be missed as they may not be shed into the bladder, from its lining. The amount shed may also be too small to detect. The biopsy of a suspicious area is more reliable. Read more...

Can bladder cancer affect urination?

Yes. Depending on the location and size of the tumor, it can cause urinary symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, and some burning or discomfort with urination. There may also be some visible blood in the urine. Read more...
Bladder cancer. In the early stages there are very few effects on the body. Blood in the urine is often the only sign. As the tumor invades and involves more of the bladder, irritative voiding symptoms can occur. Advanced and metastatic bladder cancer can spread to many areas of the body just as with most cancers. Read more...

Do routine urine tests check for bladder cancer?

No. Routine urinary and blood tests do not check for bladder cancer. If the urine test is abnormal if there are urinary symptoms to suggest bladder cancer, then specific testing must be performed to determine if bladder cancer is present. Read more...
Yes, in a way. In a very simple way, urinalysis includes chemical and cellular evidence of hematuria, or blood in the urine, a very common finding in bladder cancer. Most patients with bladder cancers will have some degree (microscopic or visible) of hematuria. However if one has blood detected in the urine, it can be from many causes other than cancer. Read more...

Does urine test can bee seen if you have bladder cancer?

Better tests. Urine test can detect bladder cancer, but a cystoscopy and biopsy would be essential for the diagnosis. See this site for information on urine tests. http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/urine-test. Read more...
Sometimes. Yes - if urine "cytology" is specifically ordered (sometimes with "fish"). Urine cytology is not the most sensitive test for bladder cancer, but is probably the least invasive - all the patient has to do is pee in a cup. Cancer would not usually be picked up on routine urinalysis or culture - which is much more commonly ordered to rule out infection, etc. Read more...

Does bladder cancer show up during routine urine testing?

No. Bladder cancer is not detected during a routine urine test (urinalysis) as part of a physical examination. If bladder cancer is suspected, a special urine test is required called a urine cytology. This test is much more specific for detecting bladder cancer although it has its limitations as well. Read more...
Often. Since most patients with bladder cancer have blood in the urine, a routine urinalysis should detect this which could trigger further evaluation. However there are possible exceptions. Read more...

If my blood and urine tests are normal, can I be sure I don't have bladder cancer?

No. Even if your blood tests and urinalysis are normal, one can still have bladder cancer. In fact, small bladder tumors can also easily be missed on radiographic studies. The gold standard test is to have an office procedure called a cystoscopy to visualize the bladder lining. Read more...
If you are under. 40, yes. Bladder cancer is not common, does not happen under 40, usually introduced by bleeding in your urine. Read more...