What are are the different protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Here are some links. This is an excellent site maintained by a heme-onc fellow on the east coast, and he has collected a few regimens for all. It's pretty tough to actually find a public site with this info: http://hemonc.Org/wiki/acute_lymphocytic_leukemia hope that helped you. Good luck.

Related Questions

I have a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

ALL. I'm sorry to here about your child with all. Do you have a question? The cure rate of all has improved dramatically over the years and is one of the success stories in oncology fsupporting the rationale of continued research and iterative improvements in care. Read more...
Question please?? I'm sure you are under tremendous stress and have a million concerns. The next year is going to be very intense and require someone to be a 24 hour a day caretaker. There will be hospitalizations, procedures, pain and tears. The great news is that most types of ALL are now curable if you follow the oncologist's care plan exactly. Please ask friends, family, any support people to help out!! Read more...

What are complications for someone with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Many side effects. There are many potential complications for somebody with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all). Some are related to the leukemia and some are due to toxicities of the treatment. Typical problems include infection, bleeding problems, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, mouth sores, hair loss, fatigue, and need for blood transfusions. There can be effects on fertility as well. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

The acute. Leukemias are those that are immediately life threatening if left untreated. The most common in children is the lymphoid t ype, ie arising from lymphocytes. In adults the myeloid type is more common. Read more...
See below. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all) is a type of cancer of the blood. The cancerous cell in all is the lymphoblast. There are differ ENT types of lymphoblasts, which lead to different types of all (b cells, t cells, pre-b cells). This leukemia is called acute because it develops fairly rapidly (over several weeks). Read more...
ALL. ALL is a type of leukemia that starts from white blood cells in the bone marrow, the soft inner part of bones. It develops from cells called lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell central to the immune system, or from lymphoblasts, an immature type of lymphocyte. ALL invades the blood and can spread throughout the body to other organs, such as the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Read more...

What are some of the risk factors for getting Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia?

Risk factors. Exposure to high levels of radiation to treat other types of cancer Exposure to certain chemicals such as benzene, a solvent used in oil refineries and other industries and present in cigarette smoke, certain cleaning products, detergents, and paint strippers Infection with human T-cell lymphoma or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) inherited genetic syndrome such as Down syndrome Being white Being male. Read more...

What are the diagnostic tests for acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Bone marrow biopsy . The diagnosis is typically with a bone marrow biopsy, cytogenetics (dna of leukemia cells), and flow cytometry (cell surface markers of leukemia cells). Read more...
See below... A blood test (cbc with morphology) is usually the initial test when a diagnosis of leukemia is suspected. Afterwards, the studies that are necessary for a complete characterization include bone marrow aspiration for morphology, flow cytometry, cytogenetics, and molecular analysis, as well as lumbar puncture for CSF analysis. Other tests may also be necessary on a case-by-case basis. Read more...

Could you tell me about acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children?

See below. It is a blood cancer in children. With advances in the treatment the prognosis has improved quite a bit. It used to be universally fatal disease about 15 years ago but now most children survive and get cured. Read more...
See below... The most common type of cancer in childhood is leukemia. The most common pediatric leukemia is acute lymphoblastic leukemia, more specifically b-all. The patient needs to be in the care of a pediatric oncologist. The prognosis depends on many factors, one of the most important ones being the genetic abnormality, but is many times very good in children with cure rates at about 80-90%, even higher. Read more...

How typical is acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children in canada?

See below. Between 2003-2007, 1257 children (age 0-19 years old) were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in canada. See the following website for more information about statistics in canada: http://www.Cancer.Ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/leukemia-childhood/statistics/?Region=on. Read more...

What is the forefront in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia research and in clinic?

Complicated. I am sorry, but there is truly no way to answer this in the 400 characters allotted. I recommend consulting with an oncologist, or communicating with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society - http://www.lls.org. Read more...