6 doctors weighed in:

Is it possible to get breast cancer twice?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Liawaty Ho
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Yes , unfortunately

It could happen in 2 different scenarios- first scenario- recurrence of disease.
Can hapen locally on the same breast or comes back on different area on the body ( metastatic disease). Second scenario- a second breast cancer. Which means this tumor is not related to the first breast cancer- can happen on the same breast or the other breast.

In brief: Yes , unfortunately

It could happen in 2 different scenarios- first scenario- recurrence of disease.
Can hapen locally on the same breast or comes back on different area on the body ( metastatic disease). Second scenario- a second breast cancer. Which means this tumor is not related to the first breast cancer- can happen on the same breast or the other breast.
Dr. Liawaty Ho
Dr. Liawaty Ho
Thank
Dr. Lawrence Hochman
Radiation Oncology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

It's possible to get breast cancer in the opposite breast, and it's possible to get a recurrence of breast cancer in the residual breast after conservative surgery and radiation.
It's also possible after a mastectomy to have recurrence on the chest wall.

In brief: Yes

It's possible to get breast cancer in the opposite breast, and it's possible to get a recurrence of breast cancer in the residual breast after conservative surgery and radiation.
It's also possible after a mastectomy to have recurrence on the chest wall.
Dr. Lawrence Hochman
Dr. Lawrence Hochman
Thank
Dr. Barry Rosen
Surgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

Any woman with a history of breast cancer is considered to be at risk for developing a second breast cancer. This risk varies between 0.
5% and 3% per year after the original diagnosis, depending upon the age of the woman and the type of breast cancer she had.

In brief: Yes

Any woman with a history of breast cancer is considered to be at risk for developing a second breast cancer. This risk varies between 0.
5% and 3% per year after the original diagnosis, depending upon the age of the woman and the type of breast cancer she had.
Dr. Barry Rosen
Dr. Barry Rosen
Thank
Read more answers from doctors