Does removing my ovaries reduce my chance of developing breast cancer?

Ovaries/breast ca. Maybe, this is very controversial. In premenopausal wo=men with breast cancer, some med oncs will suppress the ovaries with monthly shots and prescribe antiestrogen pills. Some of these women choose to have the ovaries removed but there is not much data for it. If y carry the breast cancer gene, removing the ovaries reduces ovarian cancer risk mostly rather than breast cancer risk.
For High Risk Women. Having your ovaries removed is usually reserved for women with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer due to an inherited mutation in the brca1 or brca2 gene — two genes linked to breast cancer, ovarian cancer and other cancers. High-risk women age 35 and older who have completed childbearing are the best candidates for this surgery.

Related Questions

If one has breast cancer, what's the likelihood of it spreading to an ovary?

Lower than other. sites. There is considerable variation in the spread of breast cancer ovary is not a common site. See this link for more information. http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/what-is-cancer/metastatic-fact-sheet. Read more...

How likely is it for breast cancer to spread to the ovaries?

In late stages. It is likely to spread when there is abdominal metastasis ( peritoneal ) but not common way of metastasis to ovary with out involving other organs like liver lung etc. Read more...

Is it possible to get breast cancer if one of the ovaries are removed?

Yes. Breast cancer is often affected by estrogen and/or Progesterone (made in the ovary), but not all breast cancers are, and removal of both ovaries reduces, but does not eliminate the risk. If only one ovary is removed, the risk is probably not reduced, as the body will compensate to make the same level of estrogen with the other ovary. Read more...
Yes. Removing one or even both ovaries does not eliminate the risk of breast cancer. The removal of estrogen will sometimes be recommended in the treatment of breast cancer, depending on the type of tumor. Continued regular examination and screening is still recommended. Read more...
Possible. Removal of the ovaries (one or both) may decrease the risk of developing breast cancer, but it does not eliminate the risk entirely. Read more...

If you recover from breast cancer how likely is it that you will get cancer of the ovaries?

Rare. App. 10% of women with breast cancer have the hereditary form of breast cancer, who may have a 15-40% chance of also developing ovarian cancer. The other 90% of women with breast cancer should have no greater risk of ovarian ca (1.5%) as the general population. Read more...
BRCA test. Breast and ovarian cancers are associated in those who are brca positive. Anyone who develops breast cancer under the age of 50 should be tested for the brca gene (regardless of family history and or ethnic background). In brca carriers, the risk of ovarian cancer is 45%. Read more...
Depends. If you carry a mutated brca gene , your lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer can be almost 50% . If you have breast cancer and are not brca +, your risk is probably not any more than the general population (< 1%). Check out www.Myriadlabs.Com . Read more...

Would it be pretty rare for breast cancer to be discovered only after first finding a small tumour on the ovary?

No. Breast cancer is common and can be found in any woman at any time. If there is any question of breast cancer, the only concern is to get a pathology diagnosis. Good luck and best wishes. Read more...

Can having your ovaries removed prevent breast cancer?

For High Risk Women. Having your ovaries removed is usually reserved for women with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer due to an inherited mutation in the brca1 or brca2 gene — two genes linked to breast cancer, ovarian cancer and other cancers. High-risk women age 35 and older who have completed childbearing are the best candidates for this surgery. Read more...

A friend was told to freeze her ovaries or ovarian tissue before her chemotherapy (for breast cancer), is this a common practice or still experimental?

Common practice. Yes this is common for women of child bearing age who wish to have children in the future, because chemotherapy can affect the ovaries and make a woman infertile. Read more...
Great option. This is a great option for women interested in having children. Your oncologist should send you to a infertility specialist who can work with your oncology team. Care can be coordinated so that treatment can begin while eggs are harvested. Read more...