Can a woman with breast cancer breast feed?

Possible. It is possible, but this is best discussed with your oncologists who can discuss further based on your individual treatment plan.
Yes. Prior breast cancer does not Prohibit a woman from breastfeeding, however, the affected breast may not prodice much milk if treated by radiation therapy. Furthermore, any medication that you are taking, including chemotherapy, may be transmitted in the breast milk and should be avoided.

Related Questions

Does breastfeeding only on one side alter a woman's risk of breast cancer in the non-suckled breast? My son had a preference so I nursed on the left.

Breasts. Yes, you are right to worry. All mom's should learn this lesson that they are the parent and they need to have the baby drinking from both breasts. There are ways to teach infants to drink from either breast. Read more...
No. Breast feeding is one way to reduce the risk. There are other factors, such as family history, previous breast biopsies. Hope this helps. Read more...

Can I still breast feed if I had breast cancer?

Yes. Yes you can. Just be aware that you may or may not experience decreased milk production on the breast that underwent surgery and/or radiation treatment. Read more...

Will my chances of getting breast cancer increase if I don't breast feed?

Not inthe big scheme. Breast feeding per se lowers your risk but pales in comparison to carrying to term a pregnancy before your are 23 yo. - that has more benefit - but hold the horses- i got three daughters myself and would not use that as an excuse for an early pregnancy. We are working at fox chase on chromosomal changes that occur with pregnancy to see if we can elucidate those changes that give that benefit. Read more...
Not really. The evidence linking breastfeeding and risk of breast cancer is weak at best. Prolonged breast feeding may reduce risk but is likely due to fewer menstrual cycles over the lifetime not due to breastfeeding. Read more...
Varies. Your risk depends on many factors. You should discuss your concerns with your friendly primary care physician. Read more...

Is it safe to breast feed after breast cancer?

Yes. As long as you are not receiving chemotherapy, you may breastfeed after breast cancer treatment. If your cancer was treated by radiation therapy, it is likely that you will not produce much milk, if any, from the treated breast. Read more...
Possible. It is possible, but this is best discussed with your oncologists who can discuss further based on your individual treatment plan. Read more...

My friend has recently had breast reconstruction surgery after breast cancer and she was wondering if it is possible to still breast feed?

Depends on variables. The original surgery or the reconstruction may or may not have interfered with the internal structures needed to make or transfer milk from the glands forward to the nipple, If so, breast feeding would not be possible. If they did not, it might be.The surgeons involved might be able to answer the question with more reliability. Read more...
Depends. If she and a mastectomy, most (97%) of her breast tissue was removed and she won't be able to breastfeed on that side, even if she had reconstruction. Breast reconstruction uses an implant or the patient's own tissue (flap) to replace the tissue removed by mastectomy. However, the reconstructed breast cannot produce milk. If she kept her other breast, she will be able to breastfeed on that side. Read more...

Does breastfeeding reduce the risk of breast cancer?

Yes. Women who have had children and breast feed have a lower risk for breast cancer as opposed to never pregnant women, obese women and smokers. Read more...

Does breastfeeding reduce a womens chance of breast cancer?

Yes!! Breast feeding is thought to be "protective" for breast cancer. However, there are many other factors that go into breast cancer risk. So, breast feed with the reassurance you are reducing your overall risk, but please speak with your physician about the many other factors (family history, smoking, age of first period, etc.) that effect your overall risk. Read more...
Yes. Yes we think so. Probably due to the relatively low levels of estrogen a woman has when breastfeeding. Read more...

If a mother has breast cancer and she is breastfeeding, what is the effect to her baby?

Breast cancer. If she is receiving therapy for breast cancer - chemo, antiestrogen pill etc- it is recommended for her not to breast feed. There is potentially side effect to the baby like immunosuppressant etc . Read more...
There is no effect. Breast cancer cells cannot be transmitted to a baby by breast feeding if they were in the breast milk they would be killed by the stomach acid. Read more...