Difference between autonomic neuropathy and peripheral neuropathy?

See below. Peripheral neuropathy has to do with sensation or lack of sensation of peripheral nerves: often in feet, legs and hand. Autonomic neuropathy has affects the autonomic nervous systems which control involuntary body functions such as control of blood vessel size, sweating etc.

Related Questions

What's the difference between autonomic neuropathy and pots?

HR and BP. Autonomic neuropathy is characterized by a large fall in blood pressure and a small rise in hr with standing. Pots is characterized by a large rise in hr and minimal change in BP with the same maneuver. Pots is more often seen in younger adults. Paxil (paroxetine) may contribute to symptoms of orthostasis. Read more...

Is autonomic neuropathy common after chemo? If you can develop it from chemotherapy, will it go away eventually?

No, it is uncommon. We rarely see autonomic neuropathy due to chemotherapy. It should resolve with time like most neuropathies from chemo do. Read more...
Can happen. Autonomic neuropathies do occur with some chemotherapy treatments, but is less common than the sensory or sensorimotor neuropathies. The prognosis is dependent on the level of change, intensity of chemotherapy, and whether modifications of the chemotherapy were given as well as if treatment was initiated. See your oncologist and discuss the issue. Read more...

I need recommendations/names of MN doctors who specialize in diagnosing POTS or similar autonomic neuropathy?

Try the Mayo clinic. The Mayo clinic is a world wide expert in this subject, and they have many helpful resources for evaluating this kind of problem. Read more...

What is autonomic neuropathy?

Autonomic neurop. It is a neuropathy with symptoms caused by the autonomous nervous system manifested with vasospasm, changes in blood pressure like orthostasis or sudden changes in blood pressure, pallor, rubor, increase sweat or , warmth or cold in an specific localized área of the body. Common in diabetics. Read more...
An. Damage or dysfunction of the autonomic, or 'automatic', nerves in our bodies....These nerves contribute to control of blood pressure, heart rate, peripheral vasoregulation, GI motility, sweating, tear production, oral and respiratory secretions. People with this have trouble with the above processes, namely dizziness on standing. Read more...

What exactly is autonomic neuropathy?

Autonomic neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy is a disorder that affects the autonomic nervous system, parasympathetic and/or sympathetic, which controls involuntary body functions. It can cause abnormal involuntary functions of the heart, blood vessels, sweat glands, or digestive system. autonomic neuropathy can be a complication of a number of diseases, including diabetes, or a side effect of some medications. Read more...
See below. Autonomic neuropathy is a group of symptoms that occur when there is damage to the nerves that manage every day body functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, sweating, bowel and bladder emptying, and digestion. An is a group of symptoms, not a specific disease. There are many causes. An involves damage to the nerves that carry information from the brain and spinal cord to end organs. Read more...

Can autonomic neuropathy really be idiopathic?

Yes it is. There is no obvious cause other than diabetes. So when it occurs in the absence of diabetes, it is called idiopathic. Read more...
Yes. Idiopathic sply means that we do not know the cause. The science may find a cause in future. Sometimes a patient diagnosed as idiopathic may develop conditions like diabetes several years after neuropathy was diagnosed. Read more...

Is there always a cause for autonomic neuropathy?

YES. The major feature of the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (hsans) is loss of large myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. They have been categorized into five types(hsan1-5). Read more...