What's a varus / valgus deformity?

Positions. Varus is a term to describe an inverted position. Valgus describes an everted position. It is a description for frontal plane deformities.
See below. A varus deformity would be when the 1st toe points away from the 2nd toe towards the midline of the body. Valgus deformity would be when the 1st toe points toward the 2nd toe away from the midline of the body.

Related Questions

Hi doctors, was just wondering what is a varus/valgus deformity?

See below. In looking at the foot a varus deformity is when the sole of the foot is turned into the middle of the body. A valgus deformity is when the sole is turned outward. Read more...

What is valgus deformity. Can it be repaired? My d has jra. She is ten.

Valgus. Deformity of what? Valgus describes a spatial direction. A bone is malaligned in such a position. Which bone is in a valgus? Read more...
Please see the image. In orthopedics, a valgus deformity is a term for outward angulation of the distal segment of a bone or joint. The opposite deformation, medial deviation of the distal bone, is called varus. Yes could be treated. Read more...

Can you please define hallux valgus deformity?

Bunion. It is a bony prominence on the inside of the foot at the big toe. It is a misalignment which causes the big toe to become angled toward the little toes - where the term hallux valgus comes from. It can create pain in shoes, problems with foot function and can be treated by conservative and surgical means. Not all bunions are the same. See a podiatrist and have your foot examined properly. Read more...
Bunion deformity. A bunion deformity with an external rotation of the big toe. Read more...

Hi doctors, can you tell me what is hallux valgus deformity?

A misnomer. For one. Hallux - big toe valgus - is a position on the frontal plane where an object is everted. In podiatry this is often the term used to describe a big toe being directed at the mpj towards the second toe. Sometimes referred to as a bunion (again, not entirely true.). Read more...
Complex... Deformity of the great toe and its metatarsal. The 1st metatarsal is deviated away from the rest of the forefoot bones (abducted), and the great toe (hallux) runs over the 2nd toe, sometimes overlapping/ underlapping it in the more severe cases. Read more...

I have valgus deformity and total loss of joint space laterally although not in severe pain by not having tkr done am I doing more harm putting it off?

Mind over matter. With knees, it's all about pain. If you don't mind, it don't matter. The joint is only going to get worse. One of the big issues is the life-expectancy of the hardware, which is 10-20 years so doing it too early means it might have to be re-done later. So long as your knee pain isn't bad and it isn't causing back problems, feel free to put it off, just check in with an orthopedic surgeon. Read more...
Factors to consider. Based on your description, total knee arthroplasty is likely to be your most reliable option. Pain and loss of function remain the primary reasons to undergo surgery. However, as the deformity and arthritis worsen, it can make for a more technically challenging surgery with increased risks of residual stiffness as well as nerve injuries with valgus deformities. Discuss pros and cons with surgeon. Read more...
Not necessarily. If you are not limited by pain, weakness, or giving way symptoms, there is no need to rush into knee replacement surgery. Many minor symptoms can be treated for a long time with anti-inflammatory medications or injections. If you are having pain and functional limitations, surgery can certainly help with that. Read more...