Does a flu shot have mercury in it?

Multi-dose vial, yes. Thimerosal is a mercury based preservative that is in some vaccines, including flu shots packaged as a multi-dose vial. Individually packaged single-dose shots do not have preservatives. The nasal spray flu vaccine also does not contain thimerosal. The thimerosal in shots was a tiny amount, and has been removed from children's vaccines, but was not shown to be harmful to people receiving vaccines.
Yes But... See dr kwok's response. But keep in mind that the type of mercury ( and there safe and not safe types) in the shot has been demonstrated in many, many research studies to not have or cause any serious side effects in babies whereas the influenza infection can be deadly, causing unfortunately several thousands deaths in children per year. Do not be afraid. Get the shot!

Related Questions

Is it true that the flu shot has a lot of mercury in it? Also, any chance it can give you flu like symptoms or the actual flu?

Flu vaccine . Thimerosal is a mercury-based preservative. Some vaccines produced in multi-dose vials, have thimerosal to protect against contamination of the vial. Single-dose units are without thimerosal, because they are opened and used only once. The nasal spray vaccine, is also in single-dose units and doesn't have thimerosal. It's possible to get flu-like symptoms from vaccine, but actual flu is very rare. Read more...

Can there be mercury in a 9 month old baby's flu shot vaccination?

Mercury in flu shot. It depends on how the vaccine is made and put up. 80% per cent of the flu shots have mercury (thimerosol) in them. 20% are mercury free and usually put up in single dose vials as oppossed to multiple dose vials. You can request a mercury (thimerosol) free vaccine from your pediatrician or other doctors. The regular flu vaccine has 25 micrograms of thimerosol per dose and they give 2 doses. Read more...
Yes. See dr pizzo's response. But keep in mind that the type of mercury ( and there are safe and not safe types) in the shot has been demonstrated in many, many research studies to not have or cause any serious side effects in babies whereas the influenza infection can be deadly, causing unfortunately several thousands deaths in children per year. Do not be afraid. Get the shot! Read more...

Should I get my baby a flu shot?

Yes. If there's no specific reason your child shouldn't receive the shot, like an allergy, then, yes, most definitely. Flu shots can be given yearly after 6 months of age. Not giving the shot is not the same as not taking a risk; you're just accepting the much larger risk of getting the illness and a serious complication. Besides hygiene/clean water, nothing compares with vaccines for health value. Read more...
Yes. Yes, the flu shot is recommended yearly for all babies and children six months and older. Young children suffer the most complications when they become ill with the flu, including pneumonia and dehydration, and their chance of needing to be admitted to the hospital is the highest of all age groups. They are also the primary "spreaders" of flu within a community. Read more...
Yes. Every baby 6 months on up should get a flu shot. Babies are one of the highest risk groups for complications of influenza including pneumonia, hospitalization & yes, even death. If you could decrease the chances of those by two little shots, go for it. Your infant's immune system has no prior experience with influenza, so needs that boost of help from the vaccine to get safely through first years. Read more...
Yes. If they are over 6 months that is... Babies younger than this should not get the flu shot. However if they are older the shot can help protect them from getting the flu. Parents and others in the household should also get the shot to help protect the youngest and eldest members of the community, who are most vulnerable to the flu. Read more...
Yes. Every baby 6 months on up should get a flu shot. Babies are one of the highest risk groups for complications of influenza including pneumonia, hospitalization and yes, even death. If you could decrease the chances of those by two little shots, go for it.Your infant's immune system has no prior experience with influenza, so needs that boost of help from the vaccine to get safely through first years. Read more...
Yes. It is recommended that all infants over the age of 6 months receive the flu vaccine. Read more...