Whom does breast cancer affect?

One-In-Eight Women. A common misconception is that women without a family history need not worry about breast cancer. In truth, most breast cancers occur in women with no risk factors. Furthermore, the incidence increases with age. Every woman needs to have regular screening mammograms beginning at age 40.
Mostly Women. Mostly women, although about 1% of breast cancers occur in men.

Related Questions

What will breast cancer do to people who don't die from it?

Breast Cancer. Breast cancer is definitely a deadly disease. The patients that survive deal with the psychological and physical ramifications from having cancer. Many times, the therapy (surgery, chemotherapy, radiation) can treat the cancer, but also dramatically affect the patient's well being. Seeing a plastic surgeon early can help patients deal with their disease and start to feel whole again. Read more...

If I don't have children till after 30, does that increase my cancer rates for breast cancer?

Breast cancer risk. 20 percent lower if the first birth was at age 20, 10 percent lower for first birth at age 25, and 5 percent higher if the first birth was at age 35 . The risk for a nulliparous woman is similar to that of a woman with a first full term birth at age 30. Read more...
A little bit. The most important risk factors for breast cancer are being female and being older. Breast cancer is relatively common in women over 60 and very rare in women less than 30, for example. The other important risk factor is having one or more immediate family members with bc. Not having children, or having them late in life increases your risk a little bit. Check out the gail model online. Read more...

What should I look out for on a day to day basis to ensure that I don't develop breast cancer?

Nothing daily. There are subtle changes that occur in the breasts with breast cancer. Checking daily will not help pick these up. Examining your breast monthly about the same time in your cycle is the best way to find changes in your breasts that may be significant. I usually tell patients that "lumpy oatmeal" feeling is normal, but peas and marbles aren't. Read more...
No good answers. No one knows for sure what lifestyle activities decrease a woman's risk of breast cancer. But regular exercise and avoiding alcohol seem to help. Regular exercise means doing about 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week of moderate-intensity activity like brisk walking, running, cycling, swimming, or dancing. Read more...
Early Diagnosis"key" I agree with drs. Greenhut and harris with respect to the benefit of a healthy lifestyle and performing self-examination. The only point i would add is the importance and underutilization of mammography. All women should begin getting mammograms at age 40, and yearly thereafter. Diagnosing breast cancer before it becomes palpable leads to the highest cure rates. Read more...

Women that don't have children have a relative risk of 1.6 - 1.9 of getting breast cancer. What does this actually mean though?

Breast feeding. seems to reduce your risk. If the average risk is 1, those who never had children or breast fed are 1.6-1.9 times more likely to get breast cancer. Another way to look at this is to call breast feeding a treatment. Those who "receive" it (i.e breast feed) are 1/1.9 or 50 percent less likely to get breast cancer. Read more...

Grandmother had breast cancer lived she didn't get young what are the odds of me getting breast cancer? Is it passed on by family? I don't smokeordrink

Breast cancer risk. Breast cancer in women under 25 is very rare. A history of breast cancer in your mother or sister (1st degree relative) significantly increases your risk for breast cancer, especially if they are diagnosed at an early age (50 or younger). Breast cancer in your grandma is not as significant. Breast cancer screening with mammogram is recommended starting at age 40. Read more...
Why do you ask? A close relative with early breast cancer may prompt a genetic study. Otherwise, stop second-guessing your odds. This isn't productive. Report any dominant breast mass to your physician without delay, and comply with your physician's other recommendations on screening. Best wishes. Read more...