How is breast cancer inherited between family members?

BRCA Mutations. The genetic mutations responsible for the hereditary type of breast cancer are called BRCA mutations. If either parent has this mutation, there's a 50:50 chance that any of their children will inherit this mutation. Even with this mutation, the chance of breast cancer is not 100%; it's closer to 60%(in women). Keep in mind that only 10-15% of all breast cancers in the US are the hereditary type.
Aut Dom. The brca mutations that cause hereditary breast and ovarian cancers are transmitted in an autosomal dominant pattern. This mean if one of your parents has the mutation, you have a 50% chance of having it.
Gene defects. Defects in genes that repair or control cell growth can predispose one to get cancer. These genes can sometimes be transferred from one generation to the next. There are several hereditary breast cancer genes, the most well recognized of which are the brca1 and 2.

Related Questions

Can I tell me how I can deal with a family member being diagnosed with breast cancer?

Allow yourself to. Feel ; to explore the feelings it brings up. Educate yourself about breast cancer -knowledge is very helpful. Providing support to others can be a blessing for giver. Support your loved one ; consider supporting a breast cancer cause. Don't be afraid to share what you think and feel. Take care. Read more...

Had holiday gathering with multiple family members and found out that many had metastatic breast cancer. What can I do to prevent it?

Chemoprevention. Have genetic test done .Also have your mammogram done and check with your doctor if u will qualify for preventive medications for breast cancer like evista, (raloxifene) tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors.Usually an oncologist assess the risk of developing breast cancer depending on different risk factors and facts about patient histories . Read more...
Genetic testing and. Counseling. There are two known genes (brca-1 & -2) that run in families, and there are other familial clusters without ientified molecular/genetic signatures. Not every hospital has this, but nci designanted cancer centers usually do. The tests are blood tests for the family, and counseling about impact. They will pedigree the family and find patterns and explore. Read more...
Genetic testing. Yes, i agree with dr turrisi and zafar. Talk to your family members who have breast cancer. They would need to have genetic counselling and genetic testing - to see if they carry the brca 1/2 gene mutation etc. If they carry this gene mutation, then you should ask the counsellor what your risk is and then you would probably need to get the test as well. You need prevention if your test is +. Read more...

Should I be concerned about breast cancer when I have milky draininge from my breasts (its not mastitis)? Multiple family members had breast cancer

Worth checking out. Milky discharge is common and doesn't necessarily means you have breast cancer. It could be physiologic, side effects from medications or drugs, xs stimulation of the nipples, a pituitary tumor, pregnancy...See your doctor to have it evaluated for cause and of course, to rule out cancer. Good luck. Read more...
Probably OK. If the drainage is milky (and not bloody or looking like fluid in a blister) it is probably ok, especially if you are pre-menopausal. You should probably see a breast speciialist to be sure. If your family history puts you at high enough risk, an MRI may be a better screening than mammography. Look up the gail model on the net to calculate your risk. Read more...

If two members of my immediate family developed breast cancer, should I get tested for the brca gene?

Possibly. It's always better to test the family members who have breast cancer if possible. If they are first degree relatives (mother, daughter or sister) and one was under age 50 at diagnosis, you might meet criteria for brca testing. It's best to meet with a genetic counselor who can help guide you and your family so the correct people are tested. There are non-brca mutations as well. Read more...
Maybe. It would be best if the family member with the breast cancer gets brca testing. If it was positive then you definitely need to be tested too. If she was negative, then the cancer was probably not related to brca gene mutations and you won't need to be tested. You still will be at higher for breast ca. If your family member was not willing or able to test, then you may want to be tested. Read more...
Depends. It would depend on your heritage and also at what age were your immediate family members diagnosed. I would seek the advice of a genetic counselor. Read more...
Absolutely. Women w/ 2+ immediate family members w/ a hx of breast/ovarian CA at 50% chance of developing breast cancer. If you have it, get screened with CA-125 blood test, ultrasound, mammogram/MRI, usually starting at age 30. Surgery after childbearing. Read more...

What are my chances of getting breast cancer if no one in my family has it?

The GALE model. If you google the gale model, you can input your age, number of pregnancies, family history etc. And it will give you the percent chance of you having breast cancer in the next 5 years and your lifetime risk of breast cancer. Read more...
Can estimate but ... The gail model which is available on the nci website is a good way to assess "relative" risk but will not tell you if someone is going to get breast cancer. The majority of patients diagnosed don't have a family history. The number one risk factor is being female and having breast tissue. This is the reason for population screening via bse, cbe, & mammography. Read more...

Family has no history of breast cancer, how common is breast cancer at 25 years of age.

Uncommon. Less than 0.6% of breast cancers occur under the age of 30. But it does occur, with reported 11, 000 patients diagnosed with breat csncer under age 40 in the us in one year (of the 230, 000 total breast cancer patients). If you have a breast lump or concern see a doctor. Read more...

Can men get breast cancer, should I get tested if many of the women in my family have gotten it?

Yes. Breast cancer in men is rare, but it happens. Men over 60 are more likely to get breast cancer. If you have a family history of breast and ovarian cancer or male breast cancer, you could have a brca mutation and should talk to your doctor about genetic testing. Men and women with a brca mutation have a higher chance of getting breast cancer and other cancers. Read more...
Male breast cancer. Yes, if many of women in your family have breast ca- there is risk that hereditary cancer may be in your family. You should talk to your family members- ( better be direct family member) who are affected by breast cancer and have them checked for certain genetic mutation. If any of them positive- you should see a genetician and see what is your risk and from there-have certain genetic test done. Read more...
They can. Men can get breast cancer. Perhaps it would be best for your family to meet with a genetic counselor to determine your risk and possible recommend genetic testing. Read more...

I am concerned because for a year and a half now, I've had alump. There is history of breast cancer in my nuclear family. What should I do?

See your. Doctor , do not neglect , simple examination with mammography ( some times biopsy if needed ) will establish diagnosis , at 37 could be benign , this only your doctor can tell , make the appointment now. Read more...