7 doctors weighed in:

What is the definition of essential hypertension?

7 doctors weighed in
David Miller
Family Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: High blood pressure

The definition of essential (or primary) hypertension is a sustained elevation in systemic arterial blood pressure that is not due to some other cause.
If it has some other cause (a side effect of a drug or a symptom of another disease) then it's secondary hypertension.

In brief: High blood pressure

The definition of essential (or primary) hypertension is a sustained elevation in systemic arterial blood pressure that is not due to some other cause.
If it has some other cause (a side effect of a drug or a symptom of another disease) then it's secondary hypertension.
David Miller
David Miller
Answer assisted by David Miller, Medical Student
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Dr. William Lizarraga
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: BP >140/90 w/o cause

For example there are some secondary causes of high blood pressure including sleep apnea, cushings disease, thyroid problems, etc.
High BP in the absence of these conditions is primary or essential hypertension.

In brief: BP >140/90 w/o cause

For example there are some secondary causes of high blood pressure including sleep apnea, cushings disease, thyroid problems, etc.
High BP in the absence of these conditions is primary or essential hypertension.
Dr. William Lizarraga
Dr. William Lizarraga
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Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Preventive Medicine

In brief: Brain Not Body

BP is a balance of co (cardiac output; heart pumping) vs.
Tpr (total peripheral resistance), both under brain control 24/7 (hidden yet physical responses). Issues which drive either, e.g. ?Es in co or tpr, eg. Internalized frustration, anger, pain, or ?Ed body wt typically increase bp, in precise proportion. When doctors can find body/physical reasons, most commonly call it essential/ideopathic.

In brief: Brain Not Body

BP is a balance of co (cardiac output; heart pumping) vs.
Tpr (total peripheral resistance), both under brain control 24/7 (hidden yet physical responses). Issues which drive either, e.g. ?Es in co or tpr, eg. Internalized frustration, anger, pain, or ?Ed body wt typically increase bp, in precise proportion. When doctors can find body/physical reasons, most commonly call it essential/ideopathic.
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
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