How can you prevent heat stroke? |

Medical emergency. Heat stroke is a medical emergency that can be prevented by avoiding strenuous activity during the heat of the day, staying well hydrated before experiencing thirst, staying in the shade, and various cooling methods.
Be smart and careful. There are two types of heat stroke: classic (ie episodic with heat waves) and exertional. They are very different. If you take certain medications(esp cardiac and psychiatric) you are at higher risk. The common pathway is thermoregulatory dysfunction. When that happens your body temp will rise drastically and you fry your liver, brain, etc... Know your limits, be careful on marathon in the heat.
Heat Stroke! Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat injury and is considered a medical emergency. If you suspect that someone has heat stroke -- also known as sunstroke -- call an ambulance immediately and give first aid until paramedics arrive. http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/heat-stroke-symptoms-and-treatment#1.

Related Questions

How can you prevent heat stroke and dehydration during the summer?

Stay hydrated. Take in plenty of fluids, cover the head and get out of the heat before problems occur. Read more...
Water. Pre-hydrate in hot weather before going outside. Maintain fluid and electrolyte intake while outside. Wear loose light colored clothe(to reflect the sun) and a loose fitting--well-ventilated hat. If you can, get out of the sun (shade or indoors) periodically. Observe your sweating or lack thereof. Failure to sweat in hot weather is an excellent indicator of heat stroke. Read more...
Heat Stroke! Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat injury and is considered a medical emergency. If you suspect that someone has heat stroke -- also known as sunstroke -- call an ambulance immediately and give first aid until paramedics arrive. http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/heat-stroke-symptoms-and-treatment#1. Read more...

How can I prevent heat stroke?

Cooling. Heat stroke is most linked to significantly elevated body temperatures and limited ability to cool oneself. Avoiding or minimizing time in the heat, especially when the heat index exceeds 95 degrees F. Being able to reach shaded or cooler areas every 30-60 minutes. Periodic ice packs/towels to the neck and underarms. Avoiding dehydration by drinking cool (not necessarily cold) liquids frequently. Read more...
Heat Stroke. Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat injury and is considered a medical emergency. If you suspect that someone has heat stroke -- also known as sunstroke -- call 911 immediately and give first aid until paramedics arrive. http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/heat-stroke-symptoms-and-treatment#1. Read more...

What can I do to prevent heat stroke?

Hydrate, acclimate. Exercise sensibly. Back off the intensity of workouts in severe heat, especially if you start to feel symptoms of heat-related illness or anything else unusual acclimate. Your body adjusts to the heat over time. Don't schedule tough workouts until accustomed to the conditions. Hydrate. Don't forget salt or other electrolytes. If you sweat heavily, you can reduce the level of salt in your body. Read more...
Cool water. Simple. Pre-hydrate before exposure to heat, maintain adequate hydration in the heat and stay cool. Wear loose clothing. Pace your work speed. Read more...

Can you get a heat stroke from tanning on the beach? Or a tanning bed? Does going into the fresh cold water prevent this?

Yes. Heat Stroke! Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat injury and is considered a medical emergency. If you suspect that someone has heat stroke -- also known as sunstroke -- call an ambulance immediately and give first aid until paramedics arrive. http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/heat-stroke-symptoms-and-treatment#1. Read more...

How do I know I have heat exhaustion? And how do I prevent getting heat stroke?

Ask your doctor? Some medications aggravate heat exposure. Avoid direct sun with exertion since you have a skin condition. See your doctor for breathing problems. Drink water prior to and during exercise. Stop and cool off if you feel weak, have chills, or get dizzy. Read more...

Hi ER drs :) what are good places to ice in order to prevent/cure minor heat stroke? How's top of head, forehead, back of head, neck, armpits? Others?

Central areas. Superficial application of ice to areas of the body where large blood vessels are most superficial yields the greatest cooling. Groin and armpits are the two biggest; neck (sides) is next. Ice applied to the head, back of neck, or forehead often FEEL best to people even if the cooling effect isn't as great. Careful not to cause frostbite! Stay well hydrated and limit exertion. Read more...
Heat stroke . Ice is not recommended for heat stroke. The putative mechanism is that the vasoconstriction it induces may delay heat loss. Luke warm water is recommended to the entire body with more emphasis in the groin and Scilla where the deep blood vessels can help with heat dissipation . Read more...