4 doctors weighed in:

What is heat syncope?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: Overheats and faints

A person who gets overheated will automatically dilate (widen) the blood vessels in his skin so that more blood will flow to the skin.
His body does this in hopes of cooling him down, just like the elephant who sends more blood to his ears to cool his body down. The person, however, feels lightheaded and may faint because there is not enough blood flowing his brain (too much blood is in the skin).

In brief: Overheats and faints

A person who gets overheated will automatically dilate (widen) the blood vessels in his skin so that more blood will flow to the skin.
His body does this in hopes of cooling him down, just like the elephant who sends more blood to his ears to cool his body down. The person, however, feels lightheaded and may faint because there is not enough blood flowing his brain (too much blood is in the skin).
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
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Dr. Gary Ritholz
Anesthesiology

In brief: Feinting

Heat feinting or syncope occurs when the body overheats and tries to lower its temp.
It does this by sweating and dilating small vessels near the surface to radiate heat. So the combination of loss of water and salt from sweating and dilation of blood vessels can cause a drop of blood pressure which can cause you to feint.

In brief: Feinting

Heat feinting or syncope occurs when the body overheats and tries to lower its temp.
It does this by sweating and dilating small vessels near the surface to radiate heat. So the combination of loss of water and salt from sweating and dilation of blood vessels can cause a drop of blood pressure which can cause you to feint.
Dr. Gary Ritholz
Dr. Gary Ritholz
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