Related Questions

My 5 year old son was around my girlfriends daughter of 4 on saturday. She now has bacterial pneumonia. Should I be concerned for my son's health?

Check with doctor. Pneumonia is an infection in one or both of your lungs that can be caused by several kinds of germs, such as bacteria, and viruses. It causes swelling (inflammation) of the airways and causes air sacs in the lungs to fill with mucus and other fluids, making it difficult for oxygen to reach the blood. People who are otherwise healthy often recover quickly when given prompt and proper care. Read more...
Not particularly. Bacterial pneumonia is often a secondary event in kids who have a preceding cold or lower respiratory virus. The bacteria involved are common ones carried in their own airways before conditions allow them to flourish and cause the pneumonia.For the present, just monitor your kid as you usually do and seek out an evaluation if he begins to act sick. Read more...

Is candidiasis a common secondary infection of bacterial pneumonia?

Yes. Oral candidiasis (thrush), or vaginosis is commonly seen in people treated with antibiotics. Both usually resolve with local treatment. Systemic candidiasis does occur in patients recovering from severe sepsis, but is not "common" outside the ICU except in the immune compromised. Read more...

Can bacterial pneumonia be treated?

Yes. Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections - bacterial (and viral) pneumonias can be lethal, but, in general, bacterial infections, including a bacterial pneumonia, can be treated with antibiotics (oral or intravenous). Read more...

In what way does bacterial pneumonia spread?

Respiratory droplets. Pneumonia is spread from person to person via respiratory droplets released when a person coughs, sneezes, laughs, or talks. The bacteria can live in a person's throat without causing symptoms, so you can even get it from a person who doesn't look sick. Avoid the spread of germs by washing your hands regularly, covering your mouth when you sneeze or cough, and being cautious around sick people. Read more...
It does not. Bacterial pneumonia is caused by inhalation of organisms that we are colonized with into the airway. So it is not spread person to person per se. From living our daily lives we pick up germs that live in our mouth and nose, sometimes these germs can get into the lung from aspirating tiny secretions. This is more likely when we are weakened in some way, for example a person is weak with poor cough. Read more...