What is the first treatment for sleep apnea?

Sleep apnea. Several possibilities: losing weight. See an ear nose & throat specialist to evaluate your tonsils, adenoids and sinus wear a CPAP or a custom made dental device that holds your jaw forward while you sleep thereby increasing the airway.
CPAP. CPAP is the first line treatment for sleep apnea. Weight loss should always be considered if the BMI (body mass index) is 30 or above. Other treatmemts may include surgery or oral appliances. New investigational devices look promising.
In general CPAP. For the average apnea patient CPAP should be tried first before any other therapy. However, I have had some patients with noses so obstructed and tonsils so large that I have operated on them first to clear their airway. In many of these selected patients their apnea was cured, in some they still needed cpap. A good airway exam is an important part of an apnea work up.
CPAP/BiPAP. The first treatment is application of a mask attached to a positive pressure breathing machine. This apparatus creates a pneumatic splint which keeps the airway open as you fall into deeper stages of sleep. Weight loss will cure sleep apnea, but weight loss takes time.
options. The CPAP machine and the many variations of CPAP are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea. But many people can't tolerate the machines for a variety of reasons including comfort, claustrophobia, etc. I get a lot of referrals from sleep specialists in the quad cities to make these patients oral mouthpieces, designed to bring the mandible forward and hold it there which opens up the airway.

Related Questions

What are treatments for obstructive sleep apnea?

Some treatments. The first necessity is make sure you have a sleep study. The treatments will depend upon the severity of the osa. It can be mild, moderate or severe. Treatments vary from change of life style (loss of weight, nutrition, exercise;) surgery to remove some tissue in the back of the throat; oral mouthpieces and CPAP machines. Rely upon your medical professional to discuss which option may be best. Read more...
Apnea treatments. Treatment choices include; weight loss, change in sleep position, surgery, positive pressure(cpap) and oral appliances. Read more...
Sleep Apnea Surgery. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is a disease that can affect different levels of the airway and also varies in its severity. There are many treatments, all with varying success rates and rates of relapse. However, for SEVERE sleep apnea (as demonstrated by your sleep study and your comorbidities) MMA surgery has been shown to be highly effective; it is evidence-based and upheld by solid clinical data. Read more...
OSA Treatment. Obstructive sleep apnea treatment options include: weight loss, nasal decongestant, positional therapy, CPAP (breathing mask), oral appliance therapy and surgery. See a sleep disorders specialist for a sleep study and management. Read more...

Is "Provent Therapy" from sleep apnea as effective as a CPAP or at least 50% effective, compared to CPAP?

PROVENT vs CPAP. aa30 ~ this article shows that PROVENT is NOT recommended as an alternative to CPAP in moderate to severe sleep apnea. So stay on the CPAP for now http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23723343. Read more...
Provent therapy. Cpap is the gold standard and the most effective. Pro ent can help in mild apnea but really is not that effective for moderate to severe apnea. Maybe you should contact an ent who does sleep apnea surgery if you are not tolerating cpap. Good luck and feel better! Read more...

Am sure I don't have sleep apnea. Am not overweight. Father. Mother. Brother also snore.. I have large tonsils could it be the reason. Treatments?

Need to be tested. Without a study, you can't know. Tonsils can obstruct airflow, and if blocked long enough, that is the definition of obstructive sleep apnea. Tonsil removal may be all you need, but you need an exam. Tonsils may only be part of the problem. Often it is not enough. Apnea is common in skinny people. Read more...

Are alternative treatments to mild obstructive sleep apnea (AHI of 8/H) other than CPAP/BiPAP! Are there any side effects that will arise from them?

Tongue suspension. There are several solutions such as appliances or more permanent solutions... ie http://siestamedical.com/ - there are minimally invasive solutions for alternatives to patients intolerant of cpap. May want to talk to your ear nose throat physician. Read more...
Weight management. Depending on a patients weight, getting closer a BMI under 25 may be more successful in the long term for OSA and a variety of other health issues. Read more...
2. Weight loss may help. Dental sleep appliances usually useful. See evaluation by a dentist trained in sleep medicine. Read more...

Child with sleep apnea that does not stop breathing or snore and can not use cpap! Alternative treatments?

Adenotonsillectomy. First of all, make sure that the sleep apnea is confirmed with a sleep study. If your child does have sleep apnea, adenotonsillectomy (removal of the adenoids & tonsils surgically) is often curative in children. From NIH: "Adenotonsillectomy for OSA results in a dramatic improvement in respiratory parameters as measured by polysomnography in the majority of healthy children." Read more...
Doesn't make sense. By definition, during sleep apnea you stop breathing. We all cycle during breathing, meaning there is a brief period when there is no in/out going on. To have sleep apnea the period of no in/out is extended & blood oxygen level may drop significantly. This is at least a confusion of diagnosis or labeling. A true sleep study with proper video & oxygen assessment could sort this out. Read more...

Dad has severe sleep apnea. Refuses to wear CPAP. Snores loudly and profusely. Any other treatments or suggestion?

Help him to undergo. his prescribed right treatment for his long term wellbeing and no short cuts . If he has weight problem ( most likely overweight ) make him to loose weight .Don't look for shortcuts as there are none , make sure he keeps his doctor's appointments. Read more...
Oral appliance. I'd go see a dentist about using a oral appliance. Different folks for different strokes as CPAP is a love/hate relationship and compliance may be better with a simple oral sleep apnea appliance. Read more...
Sleep Oral appliance. The sleep oral appliance therapy is an effective non-invasive treatment option for mild or moderate obstructive sleep. For severe or central sleep apnea CPAP or Bi-PAP is recommended. Surgery for OSA is usually not done unless other conservative treatments have failed. Read more...

Is sleep apnea related to COPD and/or asthma? What are some effective treatments for someone with sleep apnea and COPD - cpap, bipap, pillows?

Here we go? No, not related. Treatment is with a c-pap machine are others as you listed. Care is directed by someone trained in sleep disorders. You can have COPD and other lung diseases but not related to sleep apnea. Together, they are difficult. Read more...
No. Sleep apnea is not related to COPD or asthma. Sleep apnea and asthma sometimes share a common risk factor: obesity. Cpap/bipap therapy for sleep apnea can have the added benefit of providing additional support for people with advanced copd. CPAP is not indicated for the treatment of COPD in the home setting. Read more...
Sort of. Sleep apnea can be present in any patient, whether with COPD or not. Sleep apnea can make a COPD patient feel worse and do worse. The treatment can be anything that you mentioned: cpap, bipap. A sleep study will determine what treatment is best. Read more...

What can I expect after getting oral appliance therapy for apnea? I'm schedule to go in and talk to my dentist about an oral appliance for sleep apnea, but i'd like a little heads up about what to expect afterwards before I go. Will an oral appliance chan

The . The most effective dental devices work by pushing the lower jaw forward, thereby opening the air passage behind the tongue. Most are custom made by dentists and are adjusted periodically to find the most comfortable and effective position for the individual patient. Some things to expect: dry mouth when it occurs is usually transient and can often be compensated for by simple changes to the appliance. A small subgroup of patients has persistent dry mouth that is impossible to accept. There are patients with sjorgren’s syndrome, medication side effects and other conditions that predispose them to dry mouth and there are many over the counter and prescription remedies available. I have found two products that patients report great success with use. The first is rinsinol by oral b. It is not marketed as a product for dry mouth but as a product for treating oral ulcers but it provides excellent coverage of mucosal tissues. The second product is a prescription item made specifically to treat oral mucositis associated with chemotherapy. I use it in an off label method with amazing success. The product is gel-clair and it comes packaged in a box of 21 small packages meant to be diluted with two tablespoons of water and rinsed around the mouth. I found the product roughly equivalent to rinsinol when used in that fashion and very expensive. I have many patients who use this product full strength and apply a small amount to their tissues and find it miraculous in how it controls dry mouth all night long. An advantage to the off label method is one package can be used for several nights making it inexpensive to use. It also works extremely well for oral ulcers in its undiluted form. A problem frequently seen with oral appliances is pet dogs and cats have an affinity for eating, chewing and destroying them. Patients also are more likely to leave an oral appliance somewhere because it so small and does not require a special case. Bite changes are a more common phenomenon with oral appliances and are also easily reversible early on. When the patient wears the appliance that keeps their jaw in a different position for eight hours healing occurs in joints and adaptation will often occur. Dentists usually give their patients exercisers or positioners to return to their original position. Patients are often not aware of the bite changes. When patients are aware of the changes about 50% find them to be favorable. It is rare to see a patient discontinue use due to the bite changes. Dentists are often more upset with the bite changes than the patients are. There is also a subgroup of patients who experience tm joint problems or muscle pain when wearing appliances. These problems are almost never a reason to not use oral appliances but they need to be addressed and treated by a dentist trained to deal with TMJ disorders. The remarkable fact is that 90–95% of oral appliance users report long-term satisfaction with their treatment. The problems associated with appliance use are usually easily solved or well tolerated by patients. Many patients who start with treating their sleep apnea problems find that correcting the underlying TMJ disorders an advantage not a problem. Similarly, many patients who start seeking treatment for TMJ disorders find that they move on to treating their sleep problems. Because the underlying problems are the same it turns out that treating either problem usually helps both problems. Good luck! Read more...
Sleep . Sleep apnea is the interruption of your normal sleep pattern by a failure to breath consistently. Your breath is arrested by the tissue of your throat falling back and blocking the breathing airway. When you are are accumulating so much carbon dioxide in your blood stream that your body sensors tell you that you are close to being poisoned by it an emergency response waken you and you choke and splutter until the airway is open and you can get a gasp of air this process blows off some of the carbon dioxide and allows you to return to a fitful sleep. You will notice it is not about the oxygen so necessary to keep your brain alive and you body functioning. People who have apnea can suffer brain damage and even die from suffocation. You dentist is goin to talk to you about a device worn in the mouth that will pull the lower jaw forwards so that the tissues of the throat are less like to block the airway while you sleep. This can be a life saving device. What can you expect? Well a few days getting used to the appliance, may be some additional dental appointment for adjustments. You can expect to sleep more restfully and not be so tired during the day which prevents you from thinking clearly. You might actually live longer. It is possible that you will have bad breath from mouth breathing, so get used to needing to be extra good about oral hygeine, brush floss and rinse! dr neil mcleod dds dentistry that lasts - quality that counts. Read more...
Depends. There are a number of things that can happen as far as side effect like mild pain, teeth not fitting together in the morning, and possible tooth movement. Follow up care is key to improving the success rate. Not all patients find success. Seeing a dentist with significant experience and education treating this life threatening condition can help with side effects and improve success. Read more...