9 doctors weighed in:
What is the first treatment for sleep apnea?
9 doctors weighed in

Dr. Mark Birnbach
Dentistry - Cosmetic
3 doctors agree
In brief: Sleep apnea
Several possibilities: losing weight.
See an ear nose & throat specialist to evaluate your tonsils, adenoids and sinus wear a CPAP or a custom made dental device that holds your jaw forward while you sleep thereby increasing the airway.

In brief: Sleep apnea
Several possibilities: losing weight.
See an ear nose & throat specialist to evaluate your tonsils, adenoids and sinus wear a CPAP or a custom made dental device that holds your jaw forward while you sleep thereby increasing the airway.
Dr. Mark Birnbach
Dr. Mark Birnbach
Thank
Dr. Patrick Melder
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
2 doctors agree
In brief: CPAP
CPAP is the first line treatment for sleep apnea.
Weight loss should always be considered if the BMI (body mass index) is 30 or above. Other treatmemts may include surgery or oral appliances. New investigational devices look promising.

In brief: CPAP
CPAP is the first line treatment for sleep apnea.
Weight loss should always be considered if the BMI (body mass index) is 30 or above. Other treatmemts may include surgery or oral appliances. New investigational devices look promising.
Dr. Patrick Melder
Dr. Patrick Melder
Thank
1 comment
Dr. James Donley
CPAP for many years was considered the first line of treatment for sleep apnea. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine in February 2006, published new parameters of treatment. They said that for mild or moderate sleep apnea or someone with severe sleep apnea who wouldn't or couldn't use a CPAP, an oral appliance could be the treatment of choice. This is due at least in part because the compliance of use is usually much higher.
Dr. David Astrachan
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
1 doctor agrees
In brief: In general CPAP
For the average apnea patient CPAP should be tried first before any other therapy.
However, I have had some patients with noses so obstructed and tonsils so large that I have operated on them first to clear their airway. In many of these selected patients their apnea was cured, in some they still needed cpap. A good airway exam is an important part of an apnea work up.

In brief: In general CPAP
For the average apnea patient CPAP should be tried first before any other therapy.
However, I have had some patients with noses so obstructed and tonsils so large that I have operated on them first to clear their airway. In many of these selected patients their apnea was cured, in some they still needed cpap. A good airway exam is an important part of an apnea work up.
Dr. David Astrachan
Dr. David Astrachan
Thank
Dr. Dean Giannone
Internal Medicine
In brief: CPAP/BiPAP
The first treatment is application of a mask attached to a positive pressure breathing machine.
This apparatus creates a pneumatic splint which keeps the airway open as you fall into deeper stages of sleep. Weight loss will cure sleep apnea, but weight loss takes time.

In brief: CPAP/BiPAP
The first treatment is application of a mask attached to a positive pressure breathing machine.
This apparatus creates a pneumatic splint which keeps the airway open as you fall into deeper stages of sleep. Weight loss will cure sleep apnea, but weight loss takes time.
Dr. Dean Giannone
Dr. Dean Giannone
Thank
In brief: options
The CPAP machine and the many variations of CPAP are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea.
But many people can't tolerate the machines for a variety of reasons including comfort, claustrophobia, etc. I get a lot of referrals from sleep specialists in the quad cities to make these patients oral mouthpieces, designed to bring the mandible forward and hold it there which opens up the airway.

In brief: options
The CPAP machine and the many variations of CPAP are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea.
But many people can't tolerate the machines for a variety of reasons including comfort, claustrophobia, etc. I get a lot of referrals from sleep specialists in the quad cities to make these patients oral mouthpieces, designed to bring the mandible forward and hold it there which opens up the airway.
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Board Certified, Neurology
48 years in practice
55M people helped
Continue
107,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors