How can we prevent transient ischemic attack?

Healthy lifestyle. General recommendation is to control blood pressure, cholesterol levels, glucose levels (if diabetic), adhere to a healthy diet (mediterranean is great!), quit smoking and be physically active (at least 30 minutes per day 3 times a week). Aspirin is commonly used unless there is an indication for a blood thinner.
Many way. Tias are related most of the time to atherosclerosis. Many factors beside hereditary conditions can be related and modifying those risk factors will help. Like control of hypertension, diabetes, smoking, diet, exercise, life style, anti platelet agents, etc.
Address risks. Tia's are associated with hardening of arteries, and thus due to diabetes, hypertension, high blood fats (triglycerides for stroke risk), high homocysteine, and, of course, heart disease. Therefore, want to treat and control all of these risk factors. An ounce of prevention worth a ton of cures. But if looks like a possibility, we find benefit in drugs like Aggrenox or clopidrogrel.

Related Questions

Is it possible to have a transient ischemic attack in your 20's?

Rare. While possible, it is quite rare. Certain genetic syndromes, blood vessel abnormalities can result in strokes and tias in young adults. If there are concerning symptoms, such as one-sided weakness, numbness, speech difficulty or visual deficit, you should talk to your doctor. Read more...

How can you distinguish transient ischemic attack from a cva?  

TIA better w/in 24h. The symptoms of transient ischemic attack (TIA) and cva (stroke) are indistinguishable. By definition, a TIA completely resolves within 24 hours. Read more...
A warning. A tia, change in function of a part of the body due to loss of blood supply in the brain lasting less than a day, is a warning of more serious problems that might arise in the near future. You should quickly visit your doctor or a neurologist, discuss the symptoms and then a decision can be made about study of the source of the TIA and proper therapy. Read more...
Not until later. Tia is transient, the neurol deficit resolves within about 24h. Cva leaves more permanent (albeit somewhat reversible) damage. Tia is a warning sign for stroke. Stroke (cva) is brain attack (akin to heart attack). Sudden symptoms: change in consciousness, speech, strength, sensation, need to be evaluated emergently. Time is brain. Get checked immediately; if cva, may get rx with clot buster meds. Read more...

Is a transient ischemic attack considered the same thing as an acute stroke?

Possibly. A transient ischemic attack (TIA) is caused by the transient blockage of a blood vessel in the brain, which causes symptoms (weakness, numbness, changes in vision, difficulty speaking, etc.) because the nerve cells aren't working when the blood vessel is blocked. If the blockage is brief (< 1 hour) there may be no damage. If the blockage lasts longer, damage (a stroke) may occur. Read more...
Not quiet . Tia is otherwise called a mini stroke. As the name says the symptoms are akin to a stroke but they are temporary. The symptoms by definition should resolve completely in 24 hours. If any of the symptoms persist then you can call it a stroke. Read more...

Hoping you can tell me, is transient ischemic attack considered an acute stroke?

Yes. But is has no permanent sequelae. It can be a harbinger or worse tias or strokes to come. Get checked for carotid disease or cardiac defects such as pfo. Read more...
Yes. Yes indeed. When neurologic symptoms start suddenly we always considered it an acute stroke. If they pass within few minutes or hours completely, they get labeled tia. If they stay and there are changes on mri, then we call it a stroke. But for all practical purposes, TIA is considered an acute stroke at the onset. Read more...

What is the treatment for transient ischemic attack?

Time. A transient ischemic attack is a stroke that spontaneously resolves. All that it takes is time. However, often patients with a stroke are given clot-busting drugs to open up the clogged artery since you cannot tell initially. Read more...
Healthy lifestyle. General recommendation is to control blood pressure, cholesterol levels, glucose levels (if diabetic), adhere to a healthy diet (mediterranean is great!), quit smoking and be physically active (at least 30 minutes per day 3 times a week). Aspirin is commonly used as a first medication unless there is an indication for a blood thinner. Read more...