Are there side effects for thrombolytic therapy?

Bleeding. There are risks associated with tpa (alteplase). Complications include bleeding into the brain, other types of serious bleeding (e.g., gastrointestinal), and death. It is important to weigh the possibility of benefit against the possibility of harm. In most cases tpa (alteplase) is safe and makes a positive impact on the outcome in stroke patients.

Related Questions

What will happen during thrombolytic therapy?

Disolve a blood clot. An ischemic stroke is caused by a blood clot blocking a major artery in the brain. The effect of t-pa is to dissolve clots so that blood flow can be restored and viable brain tissue may be saved. T-pa, when introduced into the systemic circulation, binds to the fibrin protein threads of a thrombus and converts the enmeshed plasminogen to plasmin, initiating local fibrinolysis. Read more...
For which condition? Coronary-clot lysis artery clot lysis venous clot lysis these may be partial or complete and may need adjuvant or surgical assistance to be complete. The procedure may be drugs IV or lytic agent given at the site of the clot. Read more...

What should be the role of thrombolytic therapy in stroke?

Depends. The role of thrombolytic therapy in stroke is patient specific and should be rendered only at centers accredited for comprehensive stroke care. Read more...
Good treatment. If patient suitable. Iv tpa (alteplase) can be given in some patients 4.5 hours after stroke symptoms start. Tpa (alteplase) in the artery, catheter directed therapy, can be used up to 6 hours, and in special cases 24 hours after stroke starts. See stroke.Org. Read more...

What is thrombolytic therapy?

Stroke and MI. Thrombolytic therapy is the urgent application of drugs/enzymes that break down blood clots, mainly in arteries to slow down or stop the progression of heart attacks and strokes. Blocked dialysis shunts are also sometimes treated with such medications. Since busting the clot allows blood to flow freely downstream, damage to vital tissue is reduced or sometimes totally halted. Read more...

What is thrombolytic therapy?

Clot busters. It is therapy for a stroke or other clot where an enzyme that breaks down the clot is injected, either intravenously or more directed into the clot itself to break it up. Read more...
Dissolves bloodclots. Thrombolytic therapy is used to dissolve blood clots that may occur during a heart attack, stroke, pulmonary emboli (clots in the lungs), and deep vein thrombosis (clots in the arms/legs). Read more...
Clot busting. Thrombolysis is literally breaking up a clot. It is usually done in emergency situations (heart attack, stroke) where a clot is found to be responsible. It's a medical therapy usually with tpa, (alteplase) streptokinase or rarely urokinase, and is done carefully in hospital. Read more...
"Clot buster" These are medications that can be given to patients so as to break up blood clots in the lungs, heart, or for strokes and leg clots. These are utilised in situations where improving blood flow to the affected organs is critical. Examples include tpa, (alteplase) streptokinase, etc. Read more...

What does thrombolytic therapy involve?

An iv infusion. In regard to stroke only, thrombolytic therapy can be given by IV in the first 4.5 hours after the onset of symptoms. Exclusionary criteria must be met. In certain situations thrombolytic therapy is administered intra-arterially via a catheter. This procedure is performed in more specialized stroke centers and is not fda approved. It is very effective in the appropriately selected individuals. Read more...
Catheter. A catheter placed in a vein to instill the medication. Usually done in a interventional radiology setting or operating room. Read more...
Clot dissolving. Thrombolytic therapy is intended to assist the body's natural mechanism to help dissolve blood clots. These clots can be found in either arteries or veins depending on the underlying problem. I hope this helps! Read more...
Depends. Typically we now perform "catheter directed thrombolysis" where a small tube is advanced to the area of clot, and a clot busting medication is infused. Read more...

Are thrombolytic therapy and reperfusion injury related, and how?

Sort of. Thrombolytic therapy entails breaking off a blocked vessel due to a clot. In the process reperfusion injury can occur to surrounding tissues due to transient lack of oxygen and inflammatory reactions. Read more...
Could be. Reperfusion injury can occure whenever blood flow is blocked and then blood flow is reestabilished. Thrombolytic rx is one way to reestabilished blood flow in an blocked artery. Other ways to reestabilished blood flow include surgery, bypass, angioplasty, stent placement to name a few. Read more...

Which patients will benefit most from early thrombolytic therapy with intracoron?

Early presentation. Can not find the agent "intracoron", so i'm unsure if you are asking about thrombolytic therapy for stroke or heart disease. In both disorders, patients who present early in the course of their symptoms, less than one hour, have the best outcome. T-pa for stroke can be give up to 4.5 hours after symptom onset, outcomes are best the earlier the drug is given. Pts. Must meet specific criteria. Read more...
Quickness. It all depends on the speed. If the patient can't get to the specialized hospital dealing with angioplasty, he can get some reperfusion quickly in a hospital close-by. Read more...

Will thrombolytic therapy reduce the size of veins?

Probably. Thrombosis of veins results in an inflammatory response (phlebitis), and this will result in alteration of the vein wall with remodeling and this can result in shrinkage or dilation of the wall. The remaining thrombus present will result in web-like scarring within the vein narrowing the lumen and reducing the diameter. Read more...
THROMBOLYTIC RX. Thrombolytic threrapy is a method of dissolving clots in veins. It does not increase or decrease the size of veins. If successful, the clot in the vein will disappear and more blood will flow through the vein. There are several types of thrombolytic therapy including chemical, mechanical and a combination of both. Read more...