4 doctors weighed in:

Recovery time after retinal detachment surgery? Procedure: vitrectomy

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Keshav Narain
Ophthalmology - Retinal Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: 3-8 weeks.

Although less common, a short acting gas bubble in a relatively simple detachment can facilitate a shorter period of face down positioning.
Surgeons use gases with different rates of absorption for this purpose. Usually drops continue for between two and four weeks, depending on situation. Finally, silicon oil can be used and no positioning at all is required but the oil must be removed.

In brief: 3-8 weeks.

Although less common, a short acting gas bubble in a relatively simple detachment can facilitate a shorter period of face down positioning.
Surgeons use gases with different rates of absorption for this purpose. Usually drops continue for between two and four weeks, depending on situation. Finally, silicon oil can be used and no positioning at all is required but the oil must be removed.
Dr. Keshav Narain
Dr. Keshav Narain
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Dr. Yale Kanter
Ophthalmology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Detachment recovery

This may take up to 6 - 8 weeks or longer depending on the extent of the surgery.
Your surgeon can be more specific with the answer.

In brief: Detachment recovery

This may take up to 6 - 8 weeks or longer depending on the extent of the surgery.
Your surgeon can be more specific with the answer.
Dr. Yale Kanter
Dr. Yale Kanter
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Dr. Colin McCannel
Ophthalmology - Retinal Surgery

In brief: Varies

Varies by surgeon and type of surgical repair. In my practice, patients can begin returning to normal activities by 2 weeks to 2 months.
The longer restriction is usually related to the gas bubble in the eye, as, depending on the type of bubble, it can hang around for up to 2 months. Most of my patients begin easing into normal activity at 2 weeks, though.

In brief: Varies

Varies by surgeon and type of surgical repair. In my practice, patients can begin returning to normal activities by 2 weeks to 2 months.
The longer restriction is usually related to the gas bubble in the eye, as, depending on the type of bubble, it can hang around for up to 2 months. Most of my patients begin easing into normal activity at 2 weeks, though.
Dr. Colin McCannel
Dr. Colin McCannel
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