Cardiac vs pulmonary htn difference?

Location. The scales are the same, but regular hypertension is the blood pressure recorded on your arm or wrist cuff. The lungs typically are at a much lower pressure (20-30 mmhg) than the arms (120-140 mmhg). Pulmonary hypertension causes symptoms of heart failure, shortness of breath, and swelling of the legs. Regular essential hypertension is a risk factor for stroke and heart diseae.

Related Questions

I hope that this question isn't too general. Is the treatment for pulmonary hypertension always the same as the usual treatment for cardiac failure? Please elaborate if possible.

It is too general. The treatment is nearly totally different and too complex to be discussed in this forum. You need to ask your doctor to explain the differences. Read more...
No. Pulmonary hypertension requires specific medicines. Heart failure completely different medicines, though significant pulmonary hypertension can cause right sided heart failure that requires heart failure medications. Read more...

Would Cardiac stress perfusion scan MRA highlight Pulmonary Hypertension if this was present?

Probably not. A cardiac echo/Doppler study would show pulmonary HTN changes by viewing the right ventricular function , size and pressure. There are additonsl studies that can also be done. It is very important to know WHY you have Pulmonary HTN. If due chronic Pulmonary embolism it is a serious situation for which there exists very effective Rx. Other causes can also be treated. Consult your doc. Read more...

1-Is there difference between trace and mild valves regurgitation? 2-What does it mean when reported "mild/moderate" pulmonary HTN?

Insignificant. The difference between "trace" & "mild" tricuspid regurgitation is insignificant, as there is no specific treatment for the condition & no apparent consequence for having it. (In fact, there is no replacement valve surgery for the tricuspid.) Mild-to-mod pulmonary hypertension relates to high blood pressures in the lungs. The measurements aren't 100% accurate, so the degree is estimated. Read more...

Difference between pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary atrial hypertension?

Pah. They are the same, you mean pulmonary arterial hypertension. It is high blood pressure in the lung circulation. It needs to be evaluated and treard. Read more...
More specific. Pulmonary hypertension is the General Term to describe hypertension in the pulmonary circulation.Pulmonary arterial hypertension describe the site of the hypertension which is in the arterioles or pre capillary. In contrast pulmonary venous hypertension is post capillary in the pulmonary veins.The latter is commonly due to left heart failure and the former is Idiopathic or unknown cause. . Read more...
PH and PAH. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is often first detected by echocardiogram and may be caused by a variety of conditions. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused narrowing of the small lung arteries and must be diagnosed by heart catheterization. PAH requires treatment by an expert specialist. Read more...
PH vs PAH. PH (pulmonary hypertension) just indicates that the pulmonary artery pressure is increased which could be from any of several causes while pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) means the pulmonary artery pressure is high due to disease in the pulmonary arteries. PAH is a subset of PH but most cases of PH are are result of problems with the left heart and thus don't respond well to PAH medications. Read more...

What is the difference between arterial hypertension and pulmonary hypertension?

Peripheral vs Lung. Systemic arterial hypertension or just regular hypertension is elevated pressure in aorta or peripheral circulation (arms, legs). Pulmonary hypertension is elevated pressure in the pulmonary arteries in the lungs. Pulmonary hypertension usually has different causes, prognosis and much different treatment than systemic arterial hypertension. Read more...
Different entities. Arterial hypertension refers to high pressures in your systemic circulation (blood vessels in your entire body other than lung). Pulmonary hypertension refers to high pressures in the blood vessels that supply blood into the lungs. The two conditions are different & require different treatments. Please consult your doctor to get more information & tests that can be done to diagnose & treat them. Read more...
Good question. Nikita, pulmonary hypertension is an elevation of the pressures in the blood vessels in the lungs. Arterial hypertension( I am assuming systemic hypertension) is the elevation of the pressures in the arms. Pulmonary hypertension is very dangerous as it is caused by damage in the blood vessels in your lungs and the medications are very different from systemic hypertension. Read more...
PH and PAH. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is often first detected by echocardiogram and may be caused by a variety of conditions. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused narrowing of the small lung arteries and must be diagnosed by heart catheterization. PAH requires treatment by an expert specialist. Read more...

I want to know what is the difference between arterial hypertention and pulmonary hypertension?

Lungs vs body. Arterial hypertension is simply high blood pressure, as in 150/95 vs a normal 120/80. Pulmonary hypertension is increased pressure in the vessels sending blood to the lungs to be oxygenated. This puts stress on right side of the heart and can lead to heart failure if not treated. Read more...
Different. Big difference , HTN is a problem of systemic circulation and the left side of the heart , pulmonary HTN is right side of the heart , it can be a dangerous problem , need extensive work up. Read more...
Very different. Arterial HTN can be due to many factors...Rigidity of artery walls, stress or stress hormones, tumors, excess fluid. This is the force generated -and pumped against- by the left side of heart. Pulm HTN is the equivalent for the right side. Causes are left heart failure, low oxygen or sleep apnea, structural heart defects or unknown. Treatments differ for both. Both are serious and need treatment. Read more...

What is the difference between severe pulmonary hypertension and raised jugular venous pressure? Do they always coincide?

2 Different Issues. Pulmonary hypertension refers to increased blood pressures in the arteries from the right heart to the lung arterioles (arteriole size/degree-of-constriction vs. Blood flow volume determines the mean pressure). The jugular veins carry blood from the head to the superior vena cava ; right heart. Depending on several variables, either one could be elevated, normal or low while the other is not. Read more...
Difficult to discern. The real test called jvp was designed to determine presence of heart failure or fluid overload. The presence of high pressure against which the right ventricle has to work in pah causes the exaggerated bulging back of the tricuspid in rv systole and also causes jvp. Tricuspid stenosis thus would do the same thing. Read more...