Aortic stenosis --is it serious?

Depends. Depends upon degree, other underlying disease and history of progression. It certainly can be serious, but with todays sophisticated echocardiography, we see a lot of mild aortic stenosis that is identified incidentally that will never amount to much.
Aortic stenosis. This is usually progressive narrowing of the aortic valve. If the valve becomes critically narrowed, especially with symptoms of chest pain, shortness of breath, or fainting with exercise, can decrease survival significantly unless the valve is replaced.
Yes. Critical aortic stenosis may result in sudden death, stroke.Organic heart disease, heart failure, heart attack. Echocardiography and cardiac catheterization are diagnostic.

Related Questions

What's the sign in physical exam with which we can say aortic stenosis in a case is not severe?

Echocardiogram. In order to evaluate the severity of aortic stenosis you must have an echocardiogram. Several measurements are performed, including jet velocity and aortic valve area, that will determine the severity of stenosis. Physical exam findings are not consistent enough to be used as a determining factor for the degree of stenosis. Read more...

I am a patient w/ severe aortic stenosis. Can I be stabilized long enough to travel for 8 hours and wait two weeks?

See your doctor. These symptoms can only be adequately diagnosed only after a thorough evaluation by your doctor. This may include labs and other satudies. Once all of the information is in, your doctor can let you know what's going on, and what to do to help you. Read more...
Depends. Depends on if you have symptoms or not. I would recommend you call your cardiologist and review how you are feeling with them and let them advise you. Read more...

Is valvuloplasty effective in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis patient?

Generally no. Truly asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis does not usually need surgical/percutaneous treatment. The treatment of choice there is diuretics and certain, but not all, antihypertensives. However, determining who is "truly" asymptomatic should be left to the cardiologist. In general however, aortic valvuloplasty does not have good outcome and is usually reserved for last resort. Read more...
Not good results. Also results are suboptimal and procedural risk is high. Read more...

Would a valvuloplasty work on asymptomatic, severe aortic stenosis patient?

No. Aortic valvuloplasty is only a temporary measure. It is used for the patients with severe aortic stenosis who's hearts and bodies are too sick for surgery. The valvuloplasty is done in hopes of relieving the obstruction long enough for the patients to temporarily improve enough to then undergo valve replacement. A patient without symptoms would not need valvuloplasty done. Read more...
Temporarily. It would work temporarily but you wouldn't want to assume the risks of this procedure in an asymptomatic patient. Aortic valvuloplasty is largely considered palliative. Read more...

Could valvuloplasty work for patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis?

No. Valvuloplasty is used a "bridge" to surgery in patient who are 2 "sick" to tolerate surgery or it can be used as a palliative treatment. The only definitive treatment for aortic stenosis is surgical replacement or for high risk and inoperable patients, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (tavr) is available. If the patient is truly asymptomatic, close monitoring is necessary. Read more...
No. Valvuloplasty is used a "bridge" to surgery in patient who are 2 "sick" to tolerate surgery or it can be used as a palliative treatment. The only definitive treatment for aortic stenosis is surgical replacement or for high risk and inoperable patients, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (tavr) is available. If the patient is truly asymptomatic, close monitoring is necessary. Read more...
No. This is a temporizing measure for those too sick to undergo definitive treatment. In patients who can tolerate definitive therapy, it is unwise. It would be foolish to choose it. While some may be seduced by its less invasive nature, it is no match for the results archived by surgical treatment. Hope this helps. Read more...

I had to cardiologist say I have aortic stenosis one says moderate and other says moderate to severe should I see a another cardiologist?

SEMANTICS. Aortic stenosis (valve narrowing) can be a serious heart condition eventually causing heart failure, syncope (passing out) or angina (chest pain). If you have 'moderate or mod.-severe' is just semantics (word choice). The most important parameters for aortic stenosis are valve area and gradient. When valve area diminishes to <1 cm2 or gradient >50 mmhg then valve replacement-may be in future. Read more...
Valve area/gradient? What is the valve area?What is your body surface area? What is the valve gradient? Is it tricuspid or bicuspid? If bicuspid what is the diameter of the ascending aorta? Is there concomitant coronary artery disease? Is there a hypotensive response to excersise?Do you have marfan's, ehlers-danlos or another collagen disease?Unless you know these answers i can not give a professional opinion. Thanks! Read more...
Probably not. To be honest, the third may call it "moderately severe". The real question is what does it mean to you? Symptoms, limitations, surgery? Those terms are not really specific descriptions of your disease. Was one of the cardiologists a second opinion, or were both just members of a large group? Read more...
Probably not. The most important factor is, are you symptomatic? If you have any symptoms, surgical intervention is recommended. Other parameters to look at are the mean gradient > 40 , velocity > 4 m/s, and aortic valve area <1 cm2. It must followed closely. Read more...