8 doctors weighed in:
Is narcolepsy known to be a genetic disorder?
8 doctors weighed in

Dr. R Sangal
Internal Medicine - Sleep Medicine
6 doctors agree
In brief: Yes and no
In dogs narcolepsy is a genetic disorder. In humans the gene is not sufficient by itself to cause narcolepsy.
Something else triggers it, so that only one of a pair of identical twins might have it. We do not know what triggers it, but it could be an infection that triggers an auto-immune response.

In brief: Yes and no
In dogs narcolepsy is a genetic disorder. In humans the gene is not sufficient by itself to cause narcolepsy.
Something else triggers it, so that only one of a pair of identical twins might have it. We do not know what triggers it, but it could be an infection that triggers an auto-immune response.
Dr. R Sangal
Dr. R Sangal
Thank
Dr. Mark Patterson
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes
Most patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy have a genetic marker called hla dqb1*0602.
However, many people without narcolepsy also this same marker. As such, simply having the marker is not sufficient to cause the condition. The current thought is that in narcolepsy an infection triggers the immune system to attack cells in the brain which secrete a chemical (orexin) needed to keep you awake.

In brief: Yes
Most patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy have a genetic marker called hla dqb1*0602.
However, many people without narcolepsy also this same marker. As such, simply having the marker is not sufficient to cause the condition. The current thought is that in narcolepsy an infection triggers the immune system to attack cells in the brain which secrete a chemical (orexin) needed to keep you awake.
Dr. Mark Patterson
Dr. Mark Patterson
Thank
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