What does it mean if my child has atrial septal defect?

Hole in wall. You have 2 upper chambers in the heart & 2 lower.An atrial septal defect is a hole in the wall between the upper chambers. It is under less pressure than the lower chambers so it often causes no obvious problems early on. Most are closed using various methods before school age.
Atrial septal defect. 4 types. Ostium primum, ostium secundum, sinus venosus asd, patent foramen ovale. Ostium primum and sinus venosus require open heart repair. Secundum, depending on size may be amenable to clamshell device vs open heart surgery repair. Pfo most amenable to endovascular repair. Diagnosed by echocardiogram, cardiac cath. Shunt fraction, arrythmias, reversibility of pulmonary hypertension all important.

Related Questions

Doctor confirmed my child has atrial septal defect and will need to follow up. Will this be a longterm problem?

Not likely. An atrial septal defect is a hole in the wall dividing the upper chambers of the heart. It is a fairly common diagnosis, about 4 per 10, 000 live births. These often will close on their own by school age. If not, they are very easily repaired with minimally-invasive techniques. A pediatric cardiologist will need to follow them till the hole closes either naturally or surgically. Read more...
Not really. Atrial septal defects are the most benign congenital heart defects. A small percentage may become smaller over time and close on there own. If not, they can be closed by the cardiologist with a device or by the surgeon. Either way, there is virtually 100% success with minimal (if any) morbidity. Read more...
ASD. An ASD requires noninvasive studies (echo/mri) to gauge the ratio of blood that is shunted from left to right. Assessment of possibly associated congenital abnormalities is necessary. Gauging (over time) changes in symptom status, such as dyspnea with exertion, and signs of right heart pressure/volume overload and/or pulmonary hypertension are important to follow too. Read more...

How often do adults get diagnosed with an atrial septal defect that wasn't found as a child?

It happens. Generally there are 2 reasons for the delay in diagnosis: it's very small, doesn't need treatment, and doesn't matter or the individual has not been under the type of medical care that would suggest it, ie where chest xrays, ekgs, or echos are done. In 30 years, i've just found a few. Read more...
Not sure. About 1 in 4 people have a pfo, a patent foramen ovale, or small opening between the atria. In most people, this is not significant, but in some it can result in tias - transient ischemic attacks - or even strokes and must be treated medically or surgically. Read more...

What are the chances of passing an atrial septal defect from a parent to a child?

Very low. An asd, as well as most heart defects, are not hereditary traits that are passed on from parent to offspring. Read more...
3-5% The incidence of congenital heart disease in the general population is 0.8%. In patients with first degree relatives with chd, the incidence is 3-5%. There are some forms of familial ASD and the risk may be higher. Genetic testing is being developed, but not yet available for asd. I recommend that all of my patients with ASD have thier first degree relatives screened with echocardiograms. Read more...

What's it mean to have atrial septal defect?

Depends... Depends on the size and the amount of blood it is allowing to leak from the left to the right heart chambers which in turn causes strain on the right heart. This can cause shortness of breath and arrhythmias. Patient with medium size defects may not have any problems until their middle age and patients with smaller defects can lead a full healthy life without even knowing it. Read more...
4 types. Congenital absence of part or all of the interatrial septum. Secundum, primum type, sinus venosus type, foramen ovale type and unroofed coronary sinus(does not involve the septum but behaves the same). These lesions result in left to right shunting and right ventricular and pulmonary volume overload. May be missed at birth, symptoms worse after 2 weeks old if large. Diagnosed on echocardiogram. Read more...

What does it mean to have atrial septal defect?

Atrial septal defect. An atrial septel defect is a hole or opening in the tissue that separates the left and right atrium. They are classified by location and named primum, secundum or patent foramen ovale. They can be observed or in some cases treated surgically to close them. Read more...

My baby was diagnosed with both atrial septal defect and forearm patent ovale. What is prognosis?

Depends. If it is indeed only and ASD the prognosis is good. If there is a fetal syndrome the diagnosis is poorer. Genetic and cardiological studies are required before answering your question with any degree of accuracy. Read more...
Pretty good. Atrial septal Defect=hole between the upper chambers, Patent foramen ovale= normal opening between the upper chambers that usually closes after birth.The ASD can vary in size while the PFO is usually smaller. This defect may or may not produce symptoms. It is often closed on a non urgent basis before school age. Small ones can be closed through a catheter. The doc can be more specific. Read more...

How can atrial septal defect (small) and trial septal aneursym just now show up after 33 yrs? I just had a baby now have high BP too.

Occult until preg... Asds are commonly asymptomatic but your pregnancy with its increase in total body water and volume , coupled w/ HTN increases flow through the defect (shunting) and may potentially reveal its presence... Echocardiogram w/ a bubble test is needed performed by a cardiologist... Read more...
Patent foramen ovale. One of the most common causes of a "small atrial septal defect" is a patent foramen ovale. Many people live their entire lives with one. The same is true for an atrial septal aneurysm. The most significant risk factor mentioned is the high blood pressure. You should be followed closely to ensure adequate control of your blood pressure. An annual echocardiogram would also be appropriate. Read more...
Been There. The ASD was almost certain present all along. But it was likely small. Pregnancy causes many changes in a woman's body, including increased fluid retention. It is possible that the increased fluid led to conditions that made the ASD more evident. In addition, medicine evolves and we run more tests now that we did 30 years ago. Read more...