When does postpartum depression usually present after giving birth?

Anytime in first yr. Postpartum depression can present anytime in the first year. It is most common to begin within the first 3 to 4 months. However it can begin later in the first year, particularly with changes like abruptly stopping nursing, beginning of birth control pills, etc. If you suspect you may have ppd, contact your dr. And seek help from a mental health specialist with expertise in treating it.
Up to 6 months. Pp depression can present anywhere from immediately following birth, up to 6 months after. If at any time you feel symptoms of depressed mood, talk with your doctor. There are treatments available, and if caught early enough, medication may not be necessary.

Related Questions

Is it possible to treat anxiety after giving birth or postpartum depression without taking drugs?

Several things. A good walk/run is always helpful to boost endorphins. Eat a healthy balanced diet. Consider drinking some calming caffeine free teas several times a day. Get someone to watch your child and invest in a good nap everyday. Consider trying some St John's Wart supplements but clear with your MD first. Avoid alcohol. If pretty outside try to get some sunshine everyday - taking sun safety precautions. Read more...

Is it possible to have postpartum depression show up 10-12 months after the birth of baby?

Yes. Depression can have its onset at any time in life. Post partum onset has little bearing other than most post partum depressions are transient but some are biologically related to hormone shifts. This may be delayed due to nursing which maintains high hormone levels which fall after weaning. Read more...

If I had post-partum depression after giving birth to my son, does this mean that my son will have depression when he grows up?

No. Depression has a genetic component, that's true. But, post-partum depression is a particular, situation-specific, concern. While your son may be predisposed to depression due to your genes, in this case the environment, and personality, are much much more important. Read more...
There is risk, yes. Studies of post- partum depression (PPD) effects on infants of PPD mothers found poor social engagement, increased fear responses & significant infant anxiety. Treatment helps, and should continue even if breast feeding. It's safe and helps fend off later problems of cognitive, attachment and socialization issues that have been implicated in these children having higher rates of depression later. Read more...
Not necessarily. The important thing is to be able to attach and bond to your new born in as normal a fashion as possible in order to prevent future problems with your child. Read more...

What percent of women suffer form postpartum depression?

11-42% This is very common, with as many as 42% of moms experiencing ppd. The risk is higher if there is a personal or family history of ppd, depression, or anxiety. Read more...
Onset of PPD.. Postpartum depression can present anytime in the first year. It is most common to begin within the first 3 to 4 months. However it can begin later in the first year, particularly with changes like abruptly stopping nursing, beginning of birth control pills, etc. If you suspect you may have ppd, contact your dr. And seek help from a mental health specialist with expertise in treating it. Read more...

What can I do to get over postpartum depression?

Getting over. Postpartum depression can have devastating consequences for both the mother and the newborn child. Make an appointment with your doctor as soon as possible. Read more...
Call your physician. Contact a mental health professional with specialization/expertise in assessment and treatment of postpartum depression. You can contact postpartum support, international at www.Postpartum.Net. Read more...

What can I do to feel better with postpartum depression?

An antidepressant. There is something called the postpartum blues which are common and usually resolves on its' own. Then there is post partum depression which can actually be quite serious. In fact, being overly depressed for too long after delivery can interfere with the way mothers and their newborns bond and attach to each other. It is important to seek out some treatment. Ask your obstetrician for help. Read more...
GetProfessional Help. Postpartum depression is common, but that doesn't make it trivial. For some, it can be extremely severe. For most, it interferes with both joy & relationships at a key time in the life of your family. For some, the negative mood can get locked in & be long-lasting. The depressed mom has a very hard time determining how bad it is. Plus there is often guilt that blocks a mom seeking help. Don't let it. Read more...
Postpartum depressio. Treatment with psychotherapy and/or medication is helpful. Read more...

When did people begin to recognize postpartum depression?

Post partum. No data regarding this issue, but closest guess would be in the 60 's or 70's when more cases were reported, mostly from england & germany. Read more...
Hippocrates. Hippocrates wrote in 700 bc about post-partum emotional difficulties in women. German obstetrician friedrich benjamin osiander published the first full description of postpartum psychosis in 1797. Postpartum depression was first seen as a disorder in 1850's. By the 1950's these women were called "neurotic, " & treated w/valium or ect. No wonder they were reluctant to speak out then! Read more...