6 doctors weighed in:
Is there an ethics of electroconvulsive therapy?
6 doctors weighed in

Dr. James Fox
Psychiatry
3 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
Every physician takes an oath: "first, do no harm".
Ect is traditionally reserved for the most severe and intractable forms of psychiatric illness and is most effective in treating depression. Patients with certain medical conditions are excluded (including heart problems among others) and every patient is given informed consent where the benefits and risks of treatment are explained.

In brief: Yes
Every physician takes an oath: "first, do no harm".
Ect is traditionally reserved for the most severe and intractable forms of psychiatric illness and is most effective in treating depression. Patients with certain medical conditions are excluded (including heart problems among others) and every patient is given informed consent where the benefits and risks of treatment are explained.
Dr. James Fox
Dr. James Fox
Thank
Dr. Brian Lynch
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Electroshock
The straightforward answer is the ethics of a physician dictates that you choose the best and most appropriate therapy , to the best of your knowledge, to treat your patient.
You first "do no harm."i.

In brief: Electroshock
The straightforward answer is the ethics of a physician dictates that you choose the best and most appropriate therapy , to the best of your knowledge, to treat your patient.
You first "do no harm."i.
Dr. Brian Lynch
Dr. Brian Lynch
Thank
Dr. Idan Sharon
Neurology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: ECT
Ect is done today in an ethical and safe manner. It received a "bad name" in the past through movies and the way it may have been done decades ago.
It is effective and a good option.

In brief: ECT
Ect is done today in an ethical and safe manner. It received a "bad name" in the past through movies and the way it may have been done decades ago.
It is effective and a good option.
Dr. Idan Sharon
Dr. Idan Sharon
Thank
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