3 doctors weighed in:

Why do my armpits smell musky?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Vance Harris
Family Medicine

In brief: Bacteria

Sweat doesn't have a smell.
The bacteria that live on the secretions from your sweat glands give it the smell.

In brief: Bacteria

Sweat doesn't have a smell.
The bacteria that live on the secretions from your sweat glands give it the smell.
Thank
Dr. Vance Harris
Family Medicine

In brief: Bacteria

Apocrine sweat glands secrete an oil in response to stress.
Sweat is pushed to the surface of your skin where bacteria begin breaking it down. Most often, it's the bacterial breakdown of apocrine sweat that causes an odor.

In brief: Bacteria

Apocrine sweat glands secrete an oil in response to stress.
Sweat is pushed to the surface of your skin where bacteria begin breaking it down. Most often, it's the bacterial breakdown of apocrine sweat that causes an odor.
Thank
David Escobar
Family Medicine

In brief: Bacteria

Bacteria from the propionibacteria family (and others) naturally reside on the surface of our armpits.
The propionibacteria in particular are responsible for the musky "b.O." smell. Interesting trivia: bacteria from the same family are used to create the holes in swiss cheese during the fermentation process. Sounds yummy, doesn't it?!

In brief: Bacteria

Bacteria from the propionibacteria family (and others) naturally reside on the surface of our armpits.
The propionibacteria in particular are responsible for the musky "b.O." smell. Interesting trivia: bacteria from the same family are used to create the holes in swiss cheese during the fermentation process. Sounds yummy, doesn't it?!
Answer assisted by David Escobar, Medical Student
Thank
Allison Greco
General Practice

In brief: Bacteria!

The armpits have many sweat glands.
Moisture from the sweat and your own body heat create the perfect environment for bacteria to grow, which causes odor.

In brief: Bacteria!

The armpits have many sweat glands.
Moisture from the sweat and your own body heat create the perfect environment for bacteria to grow, which causes odor.
Answer assisted by Allison Greco, Medical Student
Thank