9 doctors weighed in:

How are basilar artery migraines diagnosed by doctors?

9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mark Fisher
Neurology
4 doctors agree

In brief: Outdated concept

There's no such thing as basilar "artery" migraines.
The term basilar migraine dates back to a time when migraine pathophysiology was thought to involve arterial wall constriction followed by compensatory dilation. Basilar migraine was thought due to basilar artery spasm. This notion has been discredited; however, the term is firmly entrenched & we all use it & know what it means & doesn't mean.

In brief: Outdated concept

There's no such thing as basilar "artery" migraines.
The term basilar migraine dates back to a time when migraine pathophysiology was thought to involve arterial wall constriction followed by compensatory dilation. Basilar migraine was thought due to basilar artery spasm. This notion has been discredited; however, the term is firmly entrenched & we all use it & know what it means & doesn't mean.
Thank
4 doctors agree

In brief: Clinical

By type of headache and accompanied other features pointing to brain stem, cerebellar dysfunction helps doctor to diagnose.
There are no definite tests available.

In brief: Clinical

By type of headache and accompanied other features pointing to brain stem, cerebellar dysfunction helps doctor to diagnose.
There are no definite tests available.
Thank

In brief: Symptoms are diff

Classically these occur in adolescent females, and are associated with vertigo, faintness, perhaps loss of vision and double vision, associated with/without the classical migraine headache, nausea and vomiting.

In brief: Symptoms are diff

Classically these occur in adolescent females, and are associated with vertigo, faintness, perhaps loss of vision and double vision, associated with/without the classical migraine headache, nausea and vomiting.
Thank