8 doctors weighed in:

How are basilar artery migraines diagnosed by doctors?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mark Fisher
Neurology
4 doctors agree

In brief: Outdated concept

There's no such thing as basilar "artery" migraines.
The term basilar migraine dates back to a time when migraine pathophysiology was thought to involve arterial wall constriction followed by compensatory dilation. Basilar migraine was thought due to basilar artery spasm. This notion has been discredited; however, the term is firmly entrenched & we all use it & know what it means & doesn't mean.

In brief: Outdated concept

There's no such thing as basilar "artery" migraines.
The term basilar migraine dates back to a time when migraine pathophysiology was thought to involve arterial wall constriction followed by compensatory dilation. Basilar migraine was thought due to basilar artery spasm. This notion has been discredited; however, the term is firmly entrenched & we all use it & know what it means & doesn't mean.
Dr. Mark Fisher
Dr. Mark Fisher
Thank
3 doctors agree

In brief: Clinical

By type of headache and accompanied other features pointing to brain stem, cerebellar dysfunction helps doctor to diagnose.
There are no definite tests available.

In brief: Clinical

By type of headache and accompanied other features pointing to brain stem, cerebellar dysfunction helps doctor to diagnose.
There are no definite tests available.
Dr. Nalinaksha Joshi
Dr. Nalinaksha Joshi
Thank

In brief: Symptoms are diff

Classically these occur in adolescent females, and are associated with vertigo, faintness, perhaps loss of vision and double vision, associated with/without the classical migraine headache, nausea and vomiting.

In brief: Symptoms are diff

Classically these occur in adolescent females, and are associated with vertigo, faintness, perhaps loss of vision and double vision, associated with/without the classical migraine headache, nausea and vomiting.
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Thank
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