What vaccine should my husband get before the baby is born to prevent whooping cough?

Tdap . I find few adults today have actually kept up with pertussis immunity as the vaccine was just cleared for adults a few years ago. Today we try to surround a newborn with immunized family that can't give them pertussis or the flu before they start the vaccines at 2mo. This includes all grandparents too.
Tdap. Whooping cough is caused by the germ pertussis. In older children and adults the disease is usually just an annoying cold. We vaccinate the older population to reduce the spread to infants. Infants can cough seriously for weeks after infection - even after antibiotics. Cough can be so hard it can cause bleeding in the brain. Smart to take steps to prevent exposure to your baby!
Tdap. He should get tdap. This is a tetanus shot that also has acellular pertussis in it or otherwise protects him against whopping cough. This will protect your baby against getting whopping cough from his/ her father until the baby gets protected by its own immunizations. Whopping cough is making a comeback, so this is an important thing to get done. Great question!
DtaP booster. Thank you for your very relevant and important question. You do not need a booster; you will be covered for another 8 years and your baby will be safe when born.Your husband and other family members who your baby will be frequently exposed to should receive the booster if they haven't had the vaccine in the last 10 years. As well as the influenza vaccine by sept or oct. Baby will need it at 6 mos.

Related Questions

How well do the whooping cough vaccines work in preventing whooping cough?

75-90% efficacy. The efficacies of current acellular pertussis vaccines (protection of the individual from a significant coughing and control of epidemic disease) ranges from 75 to 90%. Read more...
75-90% BUT.. They prevent anywhere from 75-90% of the infections. But the length of time that the protection remains varies in each individual from 2-3 years to 10 years.Get your boosters! Read more...
Pretty Good, But... The effectiveness of pertussis vaccines (for "whooping cough") ranges from 75 to 90% in individuals, but the effectiveness is even greater in preventing whooping cough in a community, because it becomes much harder to people to transmit and catch the disease when so many are protected. This is "herd immunity" and why it is so important for everyone to stay protected and get their boosters. Read more...

Does the whooping cough vaccine transmit to infant through breastmilk?

No. In order to give the infant protection from the vaccine being given to you, it would have to have been given while the baby was inside, in utero. Now, the baby can get immunity through his/her own vaccination only. Of course, you and any caregiver who comes in close contact with baby should have updated vaccine. That is, anyone holding the baby. Read more...

I'm having my baby next week. Grandparents, great grandparents, 9 year old step-son and husband will be around the baby for the first month. Should we all get the whooping cough vaccine?

Protecting the baby. It's a very good idea for those who will be helping take care of your baby to be vaccinated against pertussis or "whooping cough". That disease can send a baby to the ICU or worse because their little bodies just can't handle it. Although the vaccine isn't that great, some protection against pertussis would be helpful. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/pertussis/fs-parents.html. Read more...
Maybe. Neonatal infections occur in less than 4 % and most of the infections come from hospital personnel, families and friends. There is a higher risk when there are several younger kids at home and in developing coun- tries. The infection usually is higher between 4 and 28 days. Getting a whooping cough vaccine may help but observing common hygiene is better. Read more...
Yes. All the adults may get the pertussis vaccine. If the 9 ys old had his vaccine done before , ie at 5 yrs of age , he does not need again. Read more...

Why did I still get whooping cough as a child even after having all the vaccine shots?

Imperfect vaccine. Unfortunately the vaccine for pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, is not perfect. Even with a full course of vaccines, you can still get infected. While this is probably true for all vaccines, the pertussis vaccine is a prime example. If you are planning to have children, you should consider getting a booster vaccine. Newborns can have a fatal infection without ever developing a cough. Read more...
Individual factors. The vaccine used during your infancy was quite protective for most people but not totally. It was rarely if ever given over the age of 6, and teens and adults were common carriers.Since it is often most contagious early in the incubation phase, it passes readily from adults to kids or other kids well before the coughing phase starts.The newer vaccine can now be giver to older kids and adults. Read more...
Not 100% Vaccines really have been a major improvement in public health but no medicine is 100% effective. When vaccines don't prevent a disease they do usually make it much lighter. We also now know that most vaccines do not last forever . Boosters are often needed later in life. Read more...

Should I get the whooping cough vaccine after I got it when I was a child again? I am male 25.

Adult Pertussis. Yes. Absolutely. This is not a permanent vaccination. You need to be re-immunized now that we know there can be serious disease among adults exposed to this infection. Read more...

I had two seizures from the whooping cough vaccine as a child. With my first child on the way it's recommended I get it to protect her. Am I able to?

Yes! In the old days, we gave a whole cell pertussis vaccine which worked well, but had real, though rare side effects like seizures and encephalopathy. The vaccine has since been improved and we give an acellular version now and the side effects rate is much lower. In fact, it is much more likely that your child will suffer from pertussis the disease than have a reaction to the vaccine. Read more...
Probably. The vaccine you likely had as a child was dtwp-diphtheria, tetanus, and whole cell pertussis. There were a number of side effects with the whole cell pertussis component, including neurologic complications. The vaccine available now is dtap, where the "a" is for acellular. It is a much safer vaccine, and much, much less likely to cause the same problems. Read more...
Yes. The pertussis vaccine we had before 1991 had particles of dead pertussis cells.It was crude but effective but most ran fever and many had seizures.After 1991 we began use of todays acellular pertussis vaccine that is so different from the original one, that it is often the one with the least reactions.You can take it without worry of anothere severe reaction. Read more...