26 doctors weighed in:

Will my breast milk provide a large enough supply of vitamin d?

26 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lawrence Rosen
Pediatrics
4 doctors agree

In brief: Maybe

I differ in answering this than most pediatricians.
I think the most current evidence shows that women who have adequate vitamin d levels produce breastmilk with adequate vitamin d levels and thus babies can have adequate d levels. What is adequate? Most studies have shown that bf moms who get 4000iu D3 or more per day have babies with sufficient d levels.

In brief: Maybe

I differ in answering this than most pediatricians.
I think the most current evidence shows that women who have adequate vitamin d levels produce breastmilk with adequate vitamin d levels and thus babies can have adequate d levels. What is adequate? Most studies have shown that bf moms who get 4000iu D3 or more per day have babies with sufficient d levels.
Dr. Lawrence Rosen
Dr. Lawrence Rosen
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5 doctors agree

In brief: No

God, nature, or darwin decided that we should create our own vitamin d through sun exposure.
Even babies were meant to get it from the sun--even oversupplementation of mother's diet will not significantly add vitamin d to the milk. However, the damage that can be caused by the sun is not recommended either. Instead, keep breastfeeding and give at least 400 iu of vitamin d per day.

In brief: No

God, nature, or darwin decided that we should create our own vitamin d through sun exposure.
Even babies were meant to get it from the sun--even oversupplementation of mother's diet will not significantly add vitamin d to the milk. However, the damage that can be caused by the sun is not recommended either. Instead, keep breastfeeding and give at least 400 iu of vitamin d per day.
Dr. Francisco Rivera
Dr. Francisco Rivera
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2 comments
Dr. Pejman Katiraei
Dr. Rivera said it perfectly. I recommend at least 800IU for infants.
Dr. Albert Pizzo
Recommend using vitamin D3 drops at 800 IU per day. Increase as the babies get older.
3 doctors agree

In brief: No

Current recommendations are for 400 iu vitamin d supplementation in exclusively breastfed babies.
At this point, we don't know what amount of sun exposure would produce sufficient vitamin d production, and we don't know what amount is safe, especially in babies. The clinical significance of low levels of vitamin d is a hot topic right now, stay tuned as we wait for more specifics.

In brief: No

Current recommendations are for 400 iu vitamin d supplementation in exclusively breastfed babies.
At this point, we don't know what amount of sun exposure would produce sufficient vitamin d production, and we don't know what amount is safe, especially in babies. The clinical significance of low levels of vitamin d is a hot topic right now, stay tuned as we wait for more specifics.
Dr. Victoria Acharya
Dr. Victoria Acharya
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Dr. Ruben Nazario
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: No

The american academy of pediatrics recommends giving vitamin d supplements to all breast-fed babies for at least the first year, as human milk does not contain enough vitamin d to prevent vitamin d deficiency, or rickets.
The symptoms of rickets include softening of the bones, which can cause deformities and fractures.

In brief: No

The american academy of pediatrics recommends giving vitamin d supplements to all breast-fed babies for at least the first year, as human milk does not contain enough vitamin d to prevent vitamin d deficiency, or rickets.
The symptoms of rickets include softening of the bones, which can cause deformities and fractures.
Dr. Ruben Nazario
Dr. Ruben Nazario
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Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

The general recommendation is that babies who are mostly breastfed, or completely breastfed, should be given extra vitamin d.
It is believed that breastmilk alone may not provide enough vitamin d.

In brief: No

The general recommendation is that babies who are mostly breastfed, or completely breastfed, should be given extra vitamin d.
It is believed that breastmilk alone may not provide enough vitamin d.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
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Dr. Julia Sundel
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

Most americans are vitamin d deficient.
Therefore, it is very likely that your breast milk is insufficent as well. Ask your doctor to check your vit d level. Aim for a level of >50 nanograms per milliliter. You can take 1000- 2000 iu /day and try to get some sun for 15 mins, 3x/week. Give 400 iu of vit d to your baby daily.

In brief: No

Most americans are vitamin d deficient.
Therefore, it is very likely that your breast milk is insufficent as well. Ask your doctor to check your vit d level. Aim for a level of >50 nanograms per milliliter. You can take 1000- 2000 iu /day and try to get some sun for 15 mins, 3x/week. Give 400 iu of vit d to your baby daily.
Dr. Julia Sundel
Dr. Julia Sundel
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

Breast milk does not contain enough vitamin d for the baby.
The american academy of pediatrics recommends supplementing wirh 400 international units (iu) per day.

In brief: No

Breast milk does not contain enough vitamin d for the baby.
The american academy of pediatrics recommends supplementing wirh 400 international units (iu) per day.
Dr. Josephine Ruiz-Healy
Dr. Josephine Ruiz-Healy
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Dr. Lisa Roberts
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

Unfortunately, studies show that even if taking prenatal vitamins, breast milk does not secrete sufficient amounts of vit d for babies.
It is very important for your baby to get at least 400 iu vit d per day. Ask your pediatrician about which product he/she recommends. Vit d is not onlygood for your baby's bones, but also helpful to decrease risk for diabetes, autoimmune problems & some cancers.

In brief: No

Unfortunately, studies show that even if taking prenatal vitamins, breast milk does not secrete sufficient amounts of vit d for babies.
It is very important for your baby to get at least 400 iu vit d per day. Ask your pediatrician about which product he/she recommends. Vit d is not onlygood for your baby's bones, but also helpful to decrease risk for diabetes, autoimmune problems & some cancers.
Dr. Lisa Roberts
Dr. Lisa Roberts
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Dr. Jay Park
Pediatrics

In brief: No

Most infant does not get enough vitamin d from breast milk alone.
Currently, it is recommended that all breast-fed infants are to receive 400 iu (international unit) of vitamin d daily. Available over the counter, 1.0 ml of tri- or polyvisol or other equivalents are choices.

In brief: No

Most infant does not get enough vitamin d from breast milk alone.
Currently, it is recommended that all breast-fed infants are to receive 400 iu (international unit) of vitamin d daily. Available over the counter, 1.0 ml of tri- or polyvisol or other equivalents are choices.
Dr. Jay Park
Dr. Jay Park
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Dr. Cory Annis
Internal Medicine & Pediatrics

In brief: No

Of all the great things in breast milk, vitamin d is not one of them. If your baby is fed breast milk exclusively, he must be supplemented with vitamin d.

In brief: No

Of all the great things in breast milk, vitamin d is not one of them. If your baby is fed breast milk exclusively, he must be supplemented with vitamin d.
Dr. Cory Annis
Dr. Cory Annis
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Dr. Paul Trani
Pediatrics

In brief: No

There is no vitamin d in breast milk; it's the only vitamin that doesn't pass through breast milk.
That's why providers recommend that all babies get a special multivitamin for infants to supplement vitamin d.

In brief: No

There is no vitamin d in breast milk; it's the only vitamin that doesn't pass through breast milk.
That's why providers recommend that all babies get a special multivitamin for infants to supplement vitamin d.
Dr. Paul Trani
Dr. Paul Trani
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Dr. Mark Diamond
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

Usually you will, but on rare occasions, mothers may have vitamin d deficiencies with a poor supply in the breast milk.
Thus it is safer to give the baby a supplement of vitamin d to prevent even the possibility of poor bone development ( rickets).

In brief: Yes

Usually you will, but on rare occasions, mothers may have vitamin d deficiencies with a poor supply in the breast milk.
Thus it is safer to give the baby a supplement of vitamin d to prevent even the possibility of poor bone development ( rickets).
Dr. Mark Diamond
Dr. Mark Diamond
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Dr. Kevin Windisch
Pediatrics

In brief: No

We recommend 400 international units of vitamin d daily to all breast fed infants.
This can be supplied by 1 ml daily of polyvisol over the counter.

In brief: No

We recommend 400 international units of vitamin d daily to all breast fed infants.
This can be supplied by 1 ml daily of polyvisol over the counter.
Dr. Kevin Windisch
Dr. Kevin Windisch
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