Should a person with legionnaires disease be isolated?

No. The cdc says legionnaire's is not transmitted person-to-person, and my experience with the pathology of the disease and my knowledge of the nature of outbreaks makes me believe that this is true.

Related Questions

How does a person get legionnaires' disease?

Water supplies. This is very rare, but typically from stagnant water supplies like collecting cistern on rooftops. Read more...
See below. Legionaires' disease is acquired by inhalation or microaspiration of the organisms into the lungs. The most common mode of spread is when contaminated water is aerosolized by water-cooled heat rejection devices such as air conditioning cooling towers, whirlpool spas, shower heads, water misters and some respiratory therapy equipment. It is not spread from person to person. Read more...

Is legionnaires' disease spread from person to person?

No. It is spread from aerosolized (tiny droplets of ) water that harbor the organism- situations such as air-conditioning vents, misters in the vegetable aisles, ornamental water features in hospital lobbies, humidifiers with stagnant water that have been turned on... Read more...
No. People can get it from the same exposure - conference rooms with contaminated a/c, baths and jacuzzis etc. It is not spread from person to person. Read more...

What is legionnaires disease?

Probably not. Legionnaires' disease is a severe form of pneumonia — lung inflammation usually caused by infection. Legionnaires' disease is caused by a bacterium known as legionella. You can't catch legionnaires' disease from person-to-person contact. Instead, most people get legionnaires' disease from inhaling the bacteria. Older adults, smokers and people with weakened immune systems are particularly suscep. Read more...

What is legionnaires' disease?

A type of pneumonia. It is a type of pneumonia caused by a bacterium called legionella. This bacterium likes to grow in standing water such as in air conditioning units. Read more...
Named after the... Legionnaires convention in 1976 at the bellevue stratford hotel in philadelphia, it is usually a lower respiratory infection (pneumonia) caused by legionella pneumophila usually acquired from aerosols of infected water. Read more...

Is legionnaires' disease common?

No. Legionella rarely affects immunocompetent persons. Rare outbreaks like the legionairres have been reported in the us, but again it is not very common. Read more...
No. Legionnaires' diseases is not that common. Most people who get sick with exposure to the bacteria have immune deficiencies, lung damage (smokers), age of 65 or older, or work with water cooling systems. Read more...
No. According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control), it is estimated that between 8,000 and 18,000 patients are hospitalized for Legionnaire's disease in the us every year. However, these figures may be low as many of these infections go unreported or are unconfirmed. Infections can occur year round but seem to be more prevalent in the summer and fall months. Read more...
No. The bacteria that causes legionaires' disease requires a moist environment to grow. Most cases have been associated with ccontaminate air conditioning units. Read more...

What causes legionnaires disease?

Legionella sp. Legionella pneumophilia is the bacteria that causes legionaires' disease. It was first recognized when it caused an epidemic of pneumonia at a pennsylvania state american legion convention in philadelphia in 1976. Thus the name. Read more...

How is legionnaires' disease treated?

Antibiotics. The most common ones are from the class of quinolones (levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gemifloxacin) or newer macrolides (azithromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin). The antibiotics used most frequently have been Levofloxacin and azithromycin. Read more...
Antibiotics. Antibiotics used to treat legionaires' disease include erythromycin, azithromycin, tetracycline, doxycycline, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, Moxifloxacin and clarithromycin. If the patient is severely ill they are hospitalized and given supportive care. Read more...

How is legionnaires disease transmitted?

Ihalation. The bacterium Legionella Pneumophila causes most cases of Legionnaire's Disease & is spread when microscopic water drops are inhaled. Read more...
Water. Legionella lives in water and is amplified in man made water systems where water is heated and potentially stagnant. Inhalation of aerosols of this water and or aspiration of water into the lungs can cause the disease. Humidification systems, showers, hot tubs, etc have been implicated. Home systems seem to have low risk. Read more...