11 doctors weighed in:

What is the best and safest way to put my baby to sleep?

11 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
8 doctors agree

In brief: On his or her back

The chances of dying from sids (crib death) are worse, if a baby sleeps on his tummy.
Years ago in america, when babies slept on their tummies, about 3 babies out of every 1000 would die of sids. Nowadays, when babies sleep on their backs, about 1 to 1.5 babies per 1000 die of sids. Parents should talk with the doctor if a baby won't sleep on his or her back.

In brief: On his or her back

The chances of dying from sids (crib death) are worse, if a baby sleeps on his tummy.
Years ago in america, when babies slept on their tummies, about 3 babies out of every 1000 would die of sids. Nowadays, when babies sleep on their backs, about 1 to 1.5 babies per 1000 die of sids. Parents should talk with the doctor if a baby won't sleep on his or her back.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
Thank
1 comment
Dr. James Ferguson
Most infants can learn to sleep on their back if this is started with the first nap after delivery.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: On The Back

Multiple research studies in many places have demonstrated that sleeping on their backs reduces the incidence of sids by roughly 50%.
So until they roll over, this is by far the best way. In addition, some studies demonstrate that a pacifier also reduces sids, although that practice may lead to other issues.

In brief: On The Back

Multiple research studies in many places have demonstrated that sleeping on their backs reduces the incidence of sids by roughly 50%.
So until they roll over, this is by far the best way. In addition, some studies demonstrate that a pacifier also reduces sids, although that practice may lead to other issues.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Dr. Mark Diamond
Thank
Dr. Michael Coogan
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Back to sleep ...

... In his crib, without blankets, pillows, stuffed animals or bumper pads.
These unneeded extras might cover his face and make it difficult for him to breathe.

In brief: Back to sleep ...

... In his crib, without blankets, pillows, stuffed animals or bumper pads.
These unneeded extras might cover his face and make it difficult for him to breathe.
Dr. Michael Coogan
Dr. Michael Coogan
Thank
Dr. Lisa Roberts
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Laying on her back

The safest position to sleep your baby is on her back.
This position has been found to minimize your baby's risk of sida ("sudden infant death syndrome"). An alternate position is on the baby's side. It is preferred not to have your baby sleeping on her stomach however. You should also try to put your baby down in a sleepy, but awake state. This will promote her ability to fall asleep on her own.

In brief: Laying on her back

The safest position to sleep your baby is on her back.
This position has been found to minimize your baby's risk of sida ("sudden infant death syndrome"). An alternate position is on the baby's side. It is preferred not to have your baby sleeping on her stomach however. You should also try to put your baby down in a sleepy, but awake state. This will promote her ability to fall asleep on her own.
Dr. Lisa Roberts
Dr. Lisa Roberts
Thank
2 comments
Dr. James Ferguson
I believe there are published studies that equate side sleeping risk as close to that of belly sleeping.
Dr. Alan Levine
That is true..............there are such studies that show that relationship
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