What is the treatment for cauda equina syndrome?

Depends. Cauda equina is often caused by a very larger herniated disc. This can be treated with urgent surgery. Other causes would be tumors, hemorrhages and penetrating trauma, such as a gunshot wound. The outcomes from treatment are highly variable, and depend on the mechanism, degree of deficit and the timing of the intervention.

Related Questions

What is best treatment to prevent cauda equina syndrome in patient who has sciatica?

None. That's like asking, "One of the rooms in my house is uncomfortably warm. How can I prevent my house from burning down?" Aside from the fact that a house fire produces heat, the two things are unrelated. CAS is RARE. Sciatica and CAS can be produced by some of the same pathologies, but sciatica is just a pain. CAS is serious. My advice: Find something else to worry about. Read more...

Is there a cure for cauda equina syndrome?

Surgery. Cauda equina is a syndrome that causes numbness and weakness to the lower extremities from a severe compression of the nerve roots in the lumbar spine. In addition it can cause urinary or bowel problems. This is a surgical emergency and requires a decompressive procedure so to not be left with permanent nerve damage. Read more...
A laminectomy . This syndrome is due to compression of the nerve tissue that can be from several causes. Depending on the cause & location of the problem, the surgery is a decompression of the nerve tissue usually through a laminectomy but can be from an anterior or lateral approach or combined &may or may not involve a fusion & instrumentation as well. Surgery needs to be done emergently for chance of cure. Read more...

Please let me know if there is any possible cure right now for cauda equina syndrome?

Surgery or . Extremely constrictive, long term bracing in very specific circumstances are the only options. This deals with pressure on specific nerves as they start to divide after the base of the spinal cord and continued compression can lead to paralysis. Surgery is usually recommended. Read more...

Isn't there any treatment for urinary retention, who suffered from cauda equina syndrome but has a normal bladder with no problems? I am tired?

Yes. Sometimes urinary retention is handled by self catheterization, and there are meds available to enhance bladder function.. The cauda equina issues clearly can affect the important bladder function nerves, and typically once healing ensues, bladder function may improve. See a urologist and develop an approach to improve your situation. Read more...
It may take time. The neurology of bladder function is rather complicated. There are multiple centers in the brain and the spinal cord that control bladder function. It may take time before function is fully preserved. A consultation with a neurologist is your next step. Also neuro modulation, and biofeedback and pelvic physical therapy have proven to be useful in some cases. Read more...

What are symptoms of cauda equina syndrome?

Many. The nerve compression can be initially intermittent such as neurogenic claudication, with weakness, and numbness on exercise or walking. Later, perhaps, trouble with bladder and bowel, leg weakness, perhaps atrophy, numbness and pain. Read more...

What are the tests for cauda equina syndrome?

History, exam, image. Trouble emptying the bladder, new and attended by numbness in the private area (and other symptoms) prompt a rectal exam. Urgent imaging (usually mri) of the low back confirms the diagnosis. Decompression as soon as possible seems to improve the outcome. Read more...

What sort of disease is cauda equina syndrome?

SERIOUS. This literally means 'horses tail'' referring to the summation of nerves in the low back. The seriousness comes from the syndrome of all the nerves being compressed by a large lumbar (low back) disc (or tumor) causing weakness in legs and bladder & bowel changes. Immediate surgery is best treatment or permanent damage may result. Read more...

What are the symptoms of cauda equina syndrome?

Saddle anesthesia. Cauda equine syndrome is caused by compression of nerves arising from the end of the spinal cord. Symptoms can include pain, weakness and numbness in legs there can be problems with urinary function as well. Numbness in the region of the genitals and anus (saddle anesthesia) is one of the classic findings associated with this disorder that differentiate it from a less severe lumbar pinched nerve. Read more...

What can you expect from cauda equina syndrome?

Weakness. The term refers to disease affecting the terminal area below the spinal cord, and can cause bilateral leg weakness, numbness, inability to urinate, but early on may cause a neurogenic claudication, where walking or exercise creates transient numbness and weakness. Read more...