Does stevens johnson syndrome spread from one person to another?

No, not contagious. Stevens johnson syndrome (sjs, em major) is a rare and sometimes fatal allergic reaction but is not contagious. A person can have fever, malaise (general discomfort), skin itching, joint aches, and a fairly rapid appearance of reddened spots or patches. The rash can have "target" or "bulls-eye" spots, and even blisters. Eye irritation can occur, as well as sores on eyelids, lips, and in the mouth.

Related Questions

What's stevens johnson syndrome?

Severe reaction. Stevens johnson syndrome (sjs) is a severe immune reaction, usually to a medication. It can present with rash that leads to sloughing (peeling off) of the skin and mucous membranes (e.g., inside the mouth or vagina). It can also cause fever and damage to internal organs. Urgent treatment by qualified medical professionals is extremely important. See your doctor if you have further questions. Read more...

What is stevens-johnson syndrome?

See details. This is a very rare but very serious and even life threatening disorder of the skin and mucous membranes. It is usually a reaction to a medication or an infection. It usually begins with flu-like symptoms followed by a painful rash in which the top layer of the skin dies and sheds. It is an extreme emergency and requires immediate hospitalization. Read more...

Can stevens johnson syndrome be cured?

Yes, sometimes. Depending on a number of factors, stevens johnson syndrome can be treated once the offending agent can be removed from the body and the immune system can be quelled and the patient protected from infection, dehydration, and multi-organ failure. Read more...

Can you die of stevens-johnson syndrome?

Yes, SJS is serious. Stevens johnson syndrome (eryth. Multi. Major, ten) is a rare but sometimes fatal allergic reaction. A person can have fever, malaise (general discomfort), skin itching, joint aches, and a fairly rapid appearance of reddened spots or patches all over. The rash can have "target" or "bulls-eye" spots, and even blisters. Eye irritation can occur, as well as sores on eyelids, lips, and in the mouth. Read more...
Yes. If stevens-johnson syndrome (sjs) is advanced and widespread then an extreme loss of fluid may occur comparable to a sever burn. Infection can set in as well. Dehydration and infection can cause death. Read more...

Can stevens johnson syndrome be treated?

Yes, somewhat. Treatment for stevens johnson syndrome (ery. Multiforme major, toxic epider. Necrolysis) is mostly supportive. The patient has suffered a severe allergic reaction in which large areas of skin are damaged and/or blistered off. He is taken care of in a burn unit or a similar intensive care unit, because without functional skin, he is like a burn victim. Many patients still die, even with treatment. Read more...
SJS. Absolutely. Sjs is best treated in a burn unit by trained professionals. It is all patient dependent since there are differing views on the use of corticosteroids. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/pmh0001854/. Read more...

Can you die from stevens johnson syndrome?

Yes. Stevens johnson is a very serious immune reaction manifest as skin and mucosal damage and sloughing. It looks similar to and has effects like a burn. Untreated one can die of dehydration and infection. Read more...

What are the tests for stevens johnson syndrome?

BIopsy confirms. Stevens-johnson is such a severe and obvious disease of the skin, and often eyes and mucosal surfaces, that treatment (including support, and stopping any medication that might have triggered it) will not wait on lab testing. Biopsy may be used for confirmation. Read more...

Is it possible to get stevens johnson syndrome twice?

Yes, unfortunately. Patients with stevens johnson syndrome can recover and later, even years later, get it again. If the first sjs episode was caused by a known medication, the patient must avoid that medication and similar, related drugs. Some patients may have a genetic pre-disposition (inborn likelihood) to get sjs, which increases their chances of getting it a second time. Read more...