Related Questions

Best OTC for severe poison ivy around face neck ears and hands? Can it be dangerous and what to watch for if so?

OTC RX FOR POISON IV. Benadryl (diphenhydramine) every 4 hours to stop the itching, but ba careful will make you drowsy, calamine lotion and over the counter 1%hydrocortisone cream twice a day. But if it is severe and since you say face is involved, you should see your doctor as you may need systemic steroids by mouth for up to six days. It can get secondary infection and leave some scaring if not properly treated. Read more...
See your physician. Based on your description, this is far more severe than what otc Hydrocortisone can handle. Severe rash and breakdown of the skin can lead to an infection of the skin, that can be disfiguring or fatal. Health care can be expensive, but lack of health care leads to complications that are even more expensive to treat once you have no choice but to go in. See your doctor. Read more...

How can you tell the difference between poison ivy and infantigo?

There are different . Impetigo is a golden colored rash resembling honey, while with poison ivy you get a bright red irritated rash. Read more...
Impetigo. Impetigo is from an infection and does not itch. It may be transmitted to others. Poison ivy is intensely itchy and may blister and occurs only hours and days after contacting poison ivy/oak. Read more...

How should I treat poison ivy?

Cortisone steroids. Steroids are usually needed for poison ivy. A doctor prescribes them after confirming the rash is really the poison oak type. For bad rashes, oral steroids for several days are used (prednisone, prednisolone). For very mild rashes, cortisone creams can be used. A daily aveeno oatmeal bath may help. Claritin or zyrtec each morning, plus a single Benadryl (diphenhydramine) dose at bedtime, can cut down the itching. Read more...
Antihistamines. I would treat with antihistamines to control the itch, and possibly topical steroids if the rash is severe. Read more...

What should I do for poison ivy?

Avoid. Poison ivy is a common form of allergic contact dermatitis to the oleoresin of rhus plants. Depending on location and severity of symptoms, mild to potent steroid ointments are usually sufficient. If symptoms are widespread or severe, Prednisone may be needed and tapered over 2-3 weeks. Oatmeal baths and zyrtec (cetirizine) may help. Ultimately best thing is to recognize these plants and avoid them. Read more...
Poison Ivy. There are specific products that you can buy that will wash the urushiol off. Some options of treating poison ivy include calamine lotion, oatmeal soaks, Hydrocortisone cream and antihistamines. Anything which has touched urushiol from the poison ivy needs to be cleaned (clothes, shoes, gear etc.) oral steroids are sometimes indicated. Read more...

What occurs if I ate poison ivy?

Not recommended. Since poison ivy is highly sensitizing, i would not advise it. You will likely tolerate the first exposure but may become allergic to it later. At one time, poison ivy resin drop was used to desensitize patients with poison ivy dermatitis and apparently was well tolerated in small doses. Most people become allergic to poison ivy/oak through skin contact. Is this a dare with money on the table? Read more...

What are the stages of poison ivy?

Bad to worse. Most people develop allergic contact dermatitis to the waxy oil of urushiol that makes up much of the plant resin. It is a delayed-type hypersensitivity that can vary somewhat based on the type/degree of exposure and how allergic the patient is. Over time, lesions can go from dry and red, to bumpy, to huge water blisters (bullae) before they crust over and clear up. The lesions are not contagious. Read more...