6 doctors weighed in:

What will happen if my baby gets the chicken pox?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Roy Benaroch
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: Itching and fever

Fever and itchy sores last about five days.
Complications can include pneumonia and skin infections, sometimes serious. Sometimes the itchy sores scar when they heal.

In brief: Itching and fever

Fever and itchy sores last about five days.
Complications can include pneumonia and skin infections, sometimes serious. Sometimes the itchy sores scar when they heal.
Dr. Roy Benaroch
Dr. Roy Benaroch
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: With chickenpox...

...Fever and a "bubbly" rash are usually the only signs.
In most people, scarring of the skin where the bubbles popped is the only long-term effect; in some, more serious complications such as "flesh-eating disease", brain inflammation, or pneumonia, can occur. Before vaccine was introduced, about 50 children and 50 adults died each year, out of tens of thousands who contracted chickenpox.

In brief: With chickenpox...

...Fever and a "bubbly" rash are usually the only signs.
In most people, scarring of the skin where the bubbles popped is the only long-term effect; in some, more serious complications such as "flesh-eating disease", brain inflammation, or pneumonia, can occur. Before vaccine was introduced, about 50 children and 50 adults died each year, out of tens of thousands who contracted chickenpox.
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
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Dr. Bert Mandelbaum
Pediatrics

In brief: Usually Mild Case

Most infants who get the chickenpox have a mild case.
The reason for this is that antibodies from the mother (who has probably had chickenpox) cross the placenta and can last in the infant for up to one year. This gives the infant extra protection which ultimately leads to a shorter, milder case of chickenpox. If you think your child might have chickenpox, it's worth it to contact your doctor.

In brief: Usually Mild Case

Most infants who get the chickenpox have a mild case.
The reason for this is that antibodies from the mother (who has probably had chickenpox) cross the placenta and can last in the infant for up to one year. This gives the infant extra protection which ultimately leads to a shorter, milder case of chickenpox. If you think your child might have chickenpox, it's worth it to contact your doctor.
Dr. Bert Mandelbaum
Dr. Bert Mandelbaum
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