Can a child die of sudden cardiac arrest without having shown symptoms before death?

Absolutely. However, this is a diagnosis of exclusion, and far less common in babies than an unsafe sleep environment. The channelopathies are a family of illnesses that take the lives of perhaps 4000 people, including kids, in the us each year. Anatomic heart defects and missed WPW can cause sudden witnessed death; anything from black widow bite to electrocution a negative autopsy if there are no witnesses.
Rarely happens. In deference to adults, who can drop like a stone, kids usually wind down like an old wind up doll before the heart goes. The few exceptions are crib death, kids born with heart rhythm issues or secondary rhythm issues due to repaired heart defects. Most arrests will come after a period of symptoms that show attempts to compensate for dehydration, breathing failure & low blood pressure.

Related Questions

What are my chances of having a sudden cardiac arrest death? Normal echo. But have lots of couplets, pvcs and sinus pauses.

Probably very low. But a lot depends on family history of sudden death and any more malignant arrythmias. You may want to have an event monitor placed and get an excercise treadmill test even though you are still youmg this is to look at any excercise induced arrythmias you may develop.. Many young people have arrythmias that resolve as you get older. Read more...
Low. One should be evaluated for thyroid or chemical imbalances as well as intrinsic arrythmias. Read more...

Is it common for athletic children to have sudden-cardiac arrest/deaths?

Yes and no. If the child has a cardiac problem that has not been diagnosed, they are more prone to have a cardiac arrest if they participate in athletic activities. Hope this makes sense! Read more...
Rare. But does occur with some congenital lesions, marfans, trauma. Read more...

What would be the thing to do if a child has sudden cardiac arrest while playing a sport on the field?

Swift action. Put in play your abc's (airway, breathing and circulation) as fast as possible. If you determine that the child has a clear airway, is not breathing and has no pulse initiate CPR right away and instruct one specific individual to call 911 (don't just say, "someone call"). Should there be a defibrillator available delegate the use of the device to someone who knows how to use it at once. Read more...
Call 911. Start CPR immediately after calling 911. If a AED is available hook it up and follow the directions. Learn CPR and take refresher courses to keep up to date. Read more...
CPR... If anyone, including a child, has a sudden cardiac arrest, 911 should be immediately called and CPR initiated. The 911 operators can talk you through it if you are untrained. An automatic external defibrillator, or aed, should be applied according to the directions if one is available. This device will deliver a "shock" to the heart, if warranted. This can all be life-saving. Read more...

Chance of sudden cardiac arrest had normal ecgs 25 f no family history convinced im going to die?

Close to Zero chance. Sudden cardiac arrest in young adults is a rare event in competitive sports and even more so in the general community. With no family history, normal EKG and no history of unexplained syncope your chance of sudden cardiac arrest is close to ZERO. Go to my HT CHECKLIST on "overcoming anxiety and stress" that discusses CBT and my checklist on meditation. Also go to http://bit.ly/1uxTmMX Get well. Read more...

Can an electrocardiogram prevent sudden cardiac arrest in young teenagers/adults who die during marathons?

Maybe. valuation to prevent said nothing athletes can be done by an exam by my making position and or cardiologist and echocardiogram and EKG along with a family history can help identify some of the risk factors . I doing these things this can decrease some of the risk of sudden death by knowing some of the high-risk patients. Read more...
Prevent sudden death. There are 2 main reasons young athletes suffer sudden death: arrytmias, which risk may show on an ECG and anatomical abnormalities such as IHSS (Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis) or aberrant coronary arteries, which may show on an Echocardiogram. Some phycisians think both tests should be done to extreme athletes, prior to participation. Read more...
No. Deaths in triathlons are mostly from drowning. Deaths in distance runners are mostly from electrolyte troubles. Sudden death warnings on EKG include long QT and Brugada which seldom kill during exercise. I would trust history and auscultation (for HCMP, etc) for warnings and think EKG offers less yield. . Read more...
Screen test. ECG is used because it is relatively inexpensive. We have no good cost effective screening test. Cardiac arrest is rare when compared to the numbers of exercising population. Tests become more effective when a specific question within the effectiveness of the test are the reason for the test. Read more...
Maybe. An EKG can't prevent it but it may help find suggestive findings that put one at high risk and some communities are implementing these screening tools to look for Brugada, Long QT, LVH, etc, which are the more common threats. Read more...

Need expert help here. What are the symptoms of sudden cardiac arrest?

Heart stops... In a cardiac arrest, the heart stops beating so the person would become unconscious and not have a pulse. If cpr, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, is not immediately done, the person may die. Performing CPR and calling 911 may be life-saving. If interested, you can learn CPR by taking classes so check for a class near you! Read more...
Sudden Death. I am not trying to be sarcastic, at all. But, "sudden cardiac arrest" is just that: a sudden stop of the heart, and - if not treated right away - will uniformly lead to death. Perhaps someone might feel a little funny beforehand, but it is very sudden and fatal if not treated. Hope this helps... Read more...