11 doctors weighed in:

Can oral health problems? Cause a heart attack or other illness?

11 doctors weighed in
5 doctors agree

In brief: Possibly

We don't have all the answers yet but there are more studies that link oral health with overall health than studies that don't show a link between the two.
The basic theory of the oral/systemic health link is that chronic inflammation in the mouth can release certain chemicals into your bloodstream that trigger changes in the lining of arteries making clots stick or send bacteria to other organs.

In brief: Possibly

We don't have all the answers yet but there are more studies that link oral health with overall health than studies that don't show a link between the two.
The basic theory of the oral/systemic health link is that chronic inflammation in the mouth can release certain chemicals into your bloodstream that trigger changes in the lining of arteries making clots stick or send bacteria to other organs.
Dr. Charles Kattuah
Dr. Charles Kattuah
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Dr. Asaf Presente
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care
2 doctors agree

In brief: New links seen

There is an emerging body of evidence that poor oral heath can increase the body's overall inflammation - this inflammation may manifest as an increased propensity to clot which may cause or worsen heart attacks and may underlie/worsen other ailments.
Of course, these studies only show a correlation and bad oral health may simply be a marker for poorer health overall - this is being investigated.

In brief: New links seen

There is an emerging body of evidence that poor oral heath can increase the body's overall inflammation - this inflammation may manifest as an increased propensity to clot which may cause or worsen heart attacks and may underlie/worsen other ailments.
Of course, these studies only show a correlation and bad oral health may simply be a marker for poorer health overall - this is being investigated.
Dr. Asaf Presente
Dr. Asaf Presente
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1 comment
Dr. Mark Bornfeld
See the recent comment in the American Journal of Medicine: http://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343%2811%2900501-8/fulltext
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No way to know

Epidemiologic studies that rely on people's answers and people's behavior are prone to generating correlations not related to cause-and-effect.
A person who takes good care of their oral health is more likely to take good care of their heart and vice versa; this would seem the simplest explanation for the severity of gum disease correlating with heart attack risk.

In brief: No way to know

Epidemiologic studies that rely on people's answers and people's behavior are prone to generating correlations not related to cause-and-effect.
A person who takes good care of their oral health is more likely to take good care of their heart and vice versa; this would seem the simplest explanation for the severity of gum disease correlating with heart attack risk.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Ed Friedlander
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Dr. Klaus d Lessnau
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care

In brief: Check

With both your internist and your dentist.
There is a very strong connection. Better to prevent disease!

In brief: Check

With both your internist and your dentist.
There is a very strong connection. Better to prevent disease!
Dr. Klaus d Lessnau
Dr. Klaus d Lessnau
Thank
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