Whats hallux valgus?

Bunion. Hallux valgus is the medical term for a bunion. Hallux means big toe or great toe. Valgus means bent out and is used to describe a deformity in which the angulation is away from the midline of the body. Hallux valgus is when the great toe is bent out away from the midline of the body. This is a common deformity seen in 9 out of 10 women.
Misalignment. A hallux is a big toe. Valgus is a position, technically an everted position of the big toe. The term hallux valgus is often used as a synonym with a bunion though technically not correct. A bunion is simply a bump at the side of the metatarsal head.
Big toe angulation. Hallux valgus is a progressive disorder that is often described as a deviation of the big toe creating a “bump” on the side of the big toe joint which may become painful. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the framework of that joint and possibly adjacent joints. In later stages, the big toe may lean towards the second toe which throws the bones out of alignment – producing the bunion’s “bump” which may lead to pain.

Related Questions

What is hallux valgus?

A bunion! Hallux valgus is commonly known as a bunion. This is a disorder of the joint that connects the big toe to the foot. You can find out more about this condition at footcaremd.Com. Read more...
Big toe angulation. Hallux valgus is a progressive disorder that is often described as a deviation of the big toe creating a “bump” on the side of the big toe joint which may become painful. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the framework of that joint and possibly adjacent joints. In later stages, the big toe may lean towards the second toe which throws the bones out of alignment – producing the bunion’. Read more...

What is the hallux valgus?

Angulation big toe. Hallux valgus is the term often used for a bunion. The bunion is the bump that you see. Hallux (means big toe) valgus (means pointed away from the midline of the body) so hallux valgus refers to the condition where the big toe is pointed out towards the other toes. It is sometimes painful but not always. Read more...
Toe position. Hallux valgus is often referred to as a bunion. It is actually the position of the big toe where it turns toward the second toe. Read more...
Big toe angulation. Hallux valgus is a progressive disorder that is often described as a deviation of the big toe creating a “bump” on the side of the big toe joint which may become painful. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the framework of that joint and possibly adjacent joints. In later stages, the big toe may lean towards the second toe which throws the bones out of alignment – producing the bunion’. Read more...

What does "hallux valgus" mean?

Bunion. Hallux valgus is the medical term that is used to described what is commonly called a bunion. There are many nuances to this condition but essentially there is a deformity at the joint where the big toe meets the rest of the foot causing a medial prominence. Read more...
Technical term. "hallux valgus" is the technical term for a bunion, the bump some people develop at the big toe joint. "hallux" refers to the big toe itself, and "valgus" means it's rotating toward the lesser toes. Read more...
Big toe deviation. Hallux valgus is a progressive disorder referring to a rotations and deviation of the big toe creating a “bump” on the side of the big toe joint. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the framework of that joint and possibly adjacent joints. In later stages, the big toe may lean towards the second toe throwing the bones out of alignment which may lead to pain and abnormal function. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Hallux valgus?

Medial bump/1st toe. Formally defined as a > 15 degree angle between the 1st metatarsal and the great toe where the toe in question deviate towards the lessor toes. Read more...

What happens in surgery for hallux valgus?

Depends. There are too many methods to list here for hallux valgus; from a simple 'bumpectomy' to significant reconstruction. Technique chosen is based on etiology, biomechanics, and patient factors such as age, activity, smoking, previous compliance, etc. Some examples include osteotomies (surgical bone fractures) to correct alignment, fusions to prevent abnormal motion, etc. Many require fixation. Read more...
Surgically realign. During hallux valgus surgery depending on procedure the bone is surgically broken and realigned with with screws or pin for stability of the broken bone. Usually after the procedure you are put in a walking boot or cast for a period of 4-8 weeks again depending on the procedure chosen to correct your deformity. Please go to eastpennfoot.Com for more information. Read more...
Re-alignment. Various surgical procedures are available to treat hallux valgus depending on the type and severity of the deformity. The procedures are designed to correct abnormalities of soft tissues, remove the prominent “bump” of bone, correct the changes in the bony structures, and to realign the big toe and associated structures. The goal of surgery is to reduce pain and improve function. Read more...
Bunion surgery. If you elect to have it surgically removed, there are several ways your surgeon could go about it. Depending on the angle of your bones (you'll need an x-ray), there are many different procedures to choose from to correct your foot. The more aggressive procedures may require a bone cut and a screw, crutches and a boot afterward for several weeks. Read more...

Can you please define hallux valgus deformity?

Bunion. It is a bony prominence on the inside of the foot at the big toe. It is a misalignment which causes the big toe to become angled toward the little toes - where the term hallux valgus comes from. It can create pain in shoes, problems with foot function and can be treated by conservative and surgical means. Not all bunions are the same. See a podiatrist and have your foot examined properly. Read more...
Bunion deformity. A bunion deformity with an external rotation of the big toe. Read more...

Is it possible to have surgery for hallux valgus?

Most definately. And there are probably 100 different surguries too.... Read more...
Yes. Various surgical procedures are available to treat hallux valgus depending on the type and severity of the deformity. The procedures are designed to correct abnormalities of soft tissues, remove the prominent “bump” of bone, correct the changes in the bony structures, and to realign the big toe and associated structures. The goal of surgery is to reduce pain and improve function. Read more...
Bunion surgery. Unfortunately, there are no braces or exercises to get rid of a bunion. If you elect to have it surgically removed, there are several ways your surgeon could go about it. Depending on the angle of your bones (you'll need an x-ray), there are many different procedures to choose from to correct your foot. Read more...
Yes. See your specialist and x-rays will be taken and full explanation of surgery will be provided. Read more...

Is it helpful to undergo an operation for hallux valgus?

If you have pain. Then yes helpful. I, personally don't advocate corrective foot surgery for cosmetic purposes. Read more...
It Can Be... If you have pain from this deformity, especially if it is keeping you from doing the activities that you want to, then, yes... Have it corrected. If it is painless, there is really no reason to correct it except for in certain circumstances. See a podiatrist. Read more...
Can be... Surgery should be considered if you have exhausted your conservative options. Surgical management of hallux valgus varies greatly on the severity of the deformity, the general health of the patient, and on the surgeon’s training and experience. Read more...

I'm having surgery for hallux valgus, what do I need to know?

Talk to your Surgeon. Surgery is generally safe; however, it is imperative you understand that any surgery carries risks (albeit small) and you must be comfortable with the potential situations that could happen. These include (but are not limited to): surgery failure, need for further surgery, infection, dvt, pain, wound complications, loss of limb and loss of life. Talk to your surgeon & follow postop instructions. Read more...
Lots. Ask about what the plan is for pain control after surgery, find out if you will be able to walk on that foot or if you will need to be on crutches and for how long, ask about the success rate for your surgeon, ask who you should call if there are any problems after surgery. Most importantly ask yourself if you are doing this for pain or for vanity. Pain is the reason to have it fixed. Read more...
Have a good surgeon. There are many good foot surgeons. Make sure you discuss your particular procedure in detail, along the probable post operative course and possible complications with your surgeon. Not following directions can cause problems with the best surgery! listen carefully and you will do well. Dr l. Read more...
Consult with surgeon. Risks of any surgery include, pain swelling, numbness, infection, reaction to medication, blood clot, and possible scar overgrowth. Read more...
Bunion surgery. If you elect to have it surgically removed, there are several ways your surgeon could go about it. Depending on the angle of your bones (you'll need an x-ray), there are many different procedures to choose from to correct your foot. The more aggressive procedures may require a bone cut and screw, or crutches and a boot afterward for several weeks. Read more...