What is worse a malignant tumor or benign tumor?

Usually malignant. Malignant tumors tend to spread all over the body. Benign tumors tend to spread locally. If a benign tumor is in a bad place, then local spread can be very serious. You can't always ignore a tumor just because it is benign.

Related Questions

How do a benign tumor and a malignant tumor differ?

Aggressiveness. Benign tumors, while problematic, tend not to be as aggressive nor as invasive--with less potential to spread. Generally these may be removed without danger of returning. They have no cancerous cells. Malignant tumors spread more invasively & are derived from uncontrolled cancer cell growth that can metastasize to other parts of of the body. These have the risk of returning after surgery or chemo. Read more...

How does a benign tumor growth differ from a malignant tumor?

One spreads. Contrary to malignant tumor , benign tumor , growth ( division ) is less rapid, confined , contained , do not spread , both have their own distinct individual, histological appearances, the expert, the pathologist can distinguish , one from other. Read more...

What is the difference between a malignant tumor and a benign tumor?

Spreading. A benign tumor will get larger but stay in one place. A malignant tumor grows but also spreads to other places in the body to form more growths called "metastases". These are microscopic at first but then get bigger and spread further. Some types of cancers spread very early in their existence and others grow in one place for a while before spreading. Doctors know where spreading is likely to go. Read more...

How can you tell the difference between a malignant tumor and a benign tumor?

H&P important. A lot depends on the location of the tumor, the age of the patient and other factors like how it feels. This is what is called the history and physical and it's why your doctor asks a lot of nosy questions. The h&p will give us answers in 80% of cases but the rest will require testing, like special scans or biopsies. Even then, there are a few cases which are hard to know for sure! Read more...

Can removing a benign tumor surgically ever trigger the formation of a new but malignant tumor?

No. Unless the initial tumor had premalignant characteristics and incompletely removed. Or the original tumor was mischaracterized. Read more...
It depends,,, Removal of a benign tumor doesn't involve formation of a malignant tumor. However, if there wasn't total removal, or the cells around it get stimulated to proliferate and mutate, or the surgical instruments were not cleaned fully and were previously used to remove a malignant tumor, then a new malignant tumor might be formed. Read more...

How can you tell the difference between a malignant tumor and a benign tumor when you look at it?

Yes. Malignant cells don't look like normal cells, and these differences can be seen when the biopsy is examined by the pathologist under the microscope. Read more...