Is psychotherapy for treating depression?

Not only. Psychotherapy has been shown to be helpful in treating various mental ailments; psychotherapy also helps a person cope with physical ailments; psychotherapy can be used to improve communication skills, self-concept, parenting skills, anger management, etc. There is individual psychotherapy, couples/marital/family.
Cognitive-behavioral. Therapy is the most effective treatment available for depression. It may sometimes need to be supplemented with medication for best results. It's also helpful to exercise, engage is social interaction & engrossing activities, practice gratitude, do kind things for others, develop & commit to meaningful goals, practice stress management, and talk to trusted, empathic people.
Psychotherapy. Yes, individual and group therapy are very effective modalities to understand the origins of depression and for developing better coping strategies to deal with life's stressors. Best.
DEPRESSION. Get an evaluation from a psychiatrist to help identify what depression means to you and whatever else may be bothering you. Consider recommendations for medication if any are given. Get a referral for a reputable psychotherapist to speak with. Meds and therapy combined are most optimal; no just one or the other.
Yes. Depression may benefit from and need medication for the best outcome. However, research studies make clear that the best results in even severe depression are found when medication is combined with psychotherapy. Many kinds of psychotherapy are effective and it seems the most important factor is the empathy of the therapist.

Related Questions

How can I cure depression with psychotherapy?

Yes. Psychotherapy is the best treatment for depression. If the depression is profound, sometimes medication can help, but it is not necessary. Read more...
Maybe. I must disagree with a colleague here who said that psychotherapy is the best treatment for depression and that medication is not necessary. Major depressive disorder can be a very serious condition, resulting in death (by suicide), if severe enough and if inadequately treated. I am concerned about misinformation for mental illness on the internet, from acquaintances and even on this forum. Read more...
Not the best. Treatment available. We know from years of research that the best treatment is a combination of medication and therapy. Why sell yourself short? Get the best treatment! Read more...
Control, not cure. Psychotherapy can be help one recover from depression. There is good evidence that several forms of psychotherapy work as well for mild to moderate depression as medication. Choice of treatment depends on availability, and the preferences of the patient. Each treatment has advantages and disadvantages. Neither psychotherapy or medication cure depression. Both types of treatment speed up the process of recovery. Read more...
Depends on severity. Usually, medication and psychotherapy combined provide optimal results. Psychotherapy will help you to recognize sx when they occur, talk about things that might cause depressive feelings to exacerbate, also help establish routine for you, including self-care. Psychotherapy will help you look for patterns of behavior you used in the past to cope with stress. You'll learn how to control depression. Read more...
Psychotherapy. Depression is fueled by a negative self voice. Psychotherapy can help uncover the origins of your negativity and help correct your misperceptions of yourself so ultimately the way you talk to yourself becomes more understanding rather than remaining very critical. Go to the soundmindz.Org web site for information of the benefits of therapy.Best. Read more...
Depression . By being an active participant, despite depressed mood, apathy, and low energy. Follow through with clinical recommendations, such as exercise, and homework. Read more...
Considerations. If there's no evident physical basis 4 this depression & u feel stuck, therapy can help u sort out what's keeping u stuck + help u get unstuck. Learn about different approaches (eg experiential & mindfulness approaches that help u identify & experience ur emotions as u're feeling them; psychodynamic or relational approaches that trace roots of ur feelings & explore patterns in ur relationships;... Read more...
Depression. Get an evaluation from a psychiatrist to help identify what depression means to you and whatever else may be bothering you. Consider recommendations for medication if any are given. Get a referral for a reputable psychotherapist to speak with. Meds and therapy combined are most optimal; no just one or the other. Read more...

Does insurance cover psychotherapy for depression?

YES. Depression and anxiety are the two most common phenomena psychotherapists encounter in their practices, and are indeed diagnoses that insurance covers every day. Read more...
Yes, mostly. Yes, mostly. Almost all health insurance plans have mental health coverage and, by law, must cover clinically diagnosable conditions like depression. There may be some limitations depending on your particular plan. Read more...

Would psychotherapy be necessary to treat depression?

Probably not. I have had much success treating depression in the primary care setting without psychotherapy. Sometimes patients have very complex psychological issues, and at that point i get psychologists and/or psychiatrists involved. If you suspect you are depressed, go talk to your doctor! Read more...
Necessary is relativ. Medications can reduce some of the symptoms but will not change behavior that may have contributed to causing or resulting from the depression, eg. Marrital problems, work stress. Therapy and medications are complementary. It's rare for someone to get 100% better with meds alone and vice versa. Read more...
Psychotherapy. In most cases if depression persists psychotherapy can be very effective and it significantly cuts down the time it takes to recover. Best. Read more...
See below. Psychotherapy will also help you in the long-run to look at your behaviors and help you connect the dots in your experiences. It will also help you with building up awareness of your symptoms, (to know what to look for when symptom return), and triggers; psychotherapy will help you establish your routines and things that help you cope with stressors. These are skills that are useful long-term. Read more...
Therapy? Have you yet tried any form of psychotherapy? Typically, the optimal combination of things to treat emotional issues such as depression is medication (which, on your best day, is supposed to take the edge off symptoms) but the real gruntwork takes place in psychotherapist's consulting room. Read more...

Are there particular medications that work in addition to psychotherapy in teenagers for depression?

Absolutely. There are many medications. However, only a fully qualified medical doctor, specifically a child psychiatrist, is positioned to make this determination. Read more...
Psychotherapy. Without question. There are numerous medications that can help. Studies show that medicine and psychotherapy are better than either alone in some people. See a board certified child and adolescent psychiatrist for a consultation. Read more...
Yes. The studies on teens are fewer than in adults, but most of us in clinical practice have found that most antidepressants work well in teenagers. We do need to be extra careful and vigilant in treating teens with depression, because the medications may increase some suicidal thinking and behaviors in some teens. In my experience, antidepressant medications plus psychotherapy works well in teens. Read more...

Is psychotherapy effective for treating depression?

Yes. Many forms of psychotherapy have been shown to be effective treatments for depression. Read more...
YES... For mild and even moderate depression, psychotherapy alone may "do the trick." however, for more severe or "stubborn" depression, medication is a very helpful and welcome adjunct to treatment. No sense in hesitating to get the recommended and needed treatment... Read more...
Psychotherapy. Yes. Combined with medication, studies show that both together work better than either alone. Read more...
DEPRESSION. Yes, it can be. Get an evaluation from a psychiatrist to help identify what depression means to you and whatever else may be bothering you. Consider recommendations for medication if any are given. Get a referral for a reputable psychotherapist to speak with. Meds and therapy combined are most optimal; no just one or the other. Read more...

What happens if psychotherapy and drugs do not help after years of depression what hope is there?

There is always hope. Finding hope is a key component of treatment for depression. Happier people doe things that express hope and manufacture hopefulness. Talk with your doctors about this dimension of your treatment. Finding hope. Read more...

What should I do to resistant treatment depression? It is so severe and nothing has worked so far I've tried psychotherapy and all kinds of medication and nothing worked...I have been also having really bad phsyical symptoms like sick feeling, burning, st

There . There are several possibilities that should be considered and the first two that seem to be most obvious are 1. Your principal problem is not depression and 2. The way your body processes medications is uncommon, which results in a rather large number of significant side effects. To address the first possibility, you should obtain a second opinion from a psychiatrist with established expertise in diagnosis and treatment of depression. The second possibility could be addressed by genetic testing. There is a special testing kit that can determine what genetic variations are present in your liver enzymes that are responsible for elimination of antidepressant drugs. While it is not 100% but most often intolerable side effects of many antidepressants are associated with certain genetic variations in drug elimination enzymes. There might be other possibilities as well and i expect that other physicians participating in this forum will step in to offer their suggestions. I sincerely hope that eventually your problem will be solved. Read more...
Dr . Dr baskys' provided an outstanding response. Psychiatrists often use antidepressant medications to treat depression. Some recalcitrant depression responds better to mood stabilizers. I don't know if your doctor has tried this class of medication for you. I agree also, that you need a medical workup to determine if there is an organic cause for your symptoms. Read more...
Tough. It really depends on what you have used and in what combinations; sleep, wake, quite mind. All the drugs must work together for that end. High dose Folic Acid or a product called deplin; mood stabilizers as mentioned may be the ticket. I generally use lamotrigine. Are you having anxiety with insomnia, it may be worth treating. Ketamine is promising for quick reversal, modafanil is good add. Read more...
Thorough physical . You need to get a comprehensive, thorough physical exam first. You may very well have a low thyroid disorder, which may account for the lack of improvement in your illness. You may have a malabsorption disorder. You may need ECT or similar treatment. Maybe maoi's. I recommend going to a local medical school department of psychiatry for a referral for a psychiatrist for a second opinion. Read more...

Can a depressive episode and failed psychotherapy retrigger ocd? My symptoms were controlled for years, but are back in full force after depression.

Yes. It can happen , and is recommended to go see the doc that managed your conditions previously. You may need some therapy , cognitive and medical as well. Read more...
Unfortunately yes. Ocd that has been under control can return due to many factors. The stress involved in a recurrence of a depressive episode and even in a failed psychotherapy can also result in a return of OCD symptoms. It is best to seek treatment for the depression and ocd. Cognitive behavior therapy works well for both OCD and depression as well as medication therapy (in conjunction or separately). Read more...

If your patient refuses psychotherapy would you prescribe him antidepressants for mild depression?

Not necessarily. Really depends on the patients history, risk factors, supportive mechanisms and many other factors. While medicine can be very helpful - quite a few studies have shown that the combination of medicine and psychotherapy is of greater benefit. Hope that helps! Read more...
Agree w Dr Gaffney. Medications are not always the answer. Cognitive Behavioral therapy or psychotherapy can be effective. However there are other options. Aim for daily exercise, 8 hours of sleep per night & good nutrition w 5 servings of veggies & 4 of fruit per day. Try tai chi, yoga, Qi Gong, progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing exercises & meditation. Don't isolate - spend time w friends & stay active. Read more...