5 doctors weighed in:
Is megaloblastic anemia an inherited condition?
5 doctors weighed in

Dr. Ritesh Rathore
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Not commonly
Most cases of this condition reflect deficiencies of key vitamins (b12, folic acid) and occur due to dietary deficiencies, pregnancy, pernicious anemia, medications.
Rare inherited forms can occur in which the carrier proteins for B12 may be low for example.

In brief: Not commonly
Most cases of this condition reflect deficiencies of key vitamins (b12, folic acid) and occur due to dietary deficiencies, pregnancy, pernicious anemia, medications.
Rare inherited forms can occur in which the carrier proteins for B12 may be low for example.
Dr. Ritesh Rathore
Dr. Ritesh Rathore
Thank
Dr. Michael Engel
Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology
In brief: I agree with
Dr. Rathore. I'd also like to add that megaloblasic changes can be seen with the evolution of myelodysplasias, although there will usually be other count abnormalities accompanying these conditions.
Most isolated megaloblastic anemia in the us is due to folate (folic acid) or B12 deficiency, both of which are easily corrected. You might also inquire about increased nuclear segments in your neutrophils.

In brief: I agree with
Dr. Rathore. I'd also like to add that megaloblasic changes can be seen with the evolution of myelodysplasias, although there will usually be other count abnormalities accompanying these conditions.
Most isolated megaloblastic anemia in the us is due to folate (folic acid) or B12 deficiency, both of which are easily corrected. You might also inquire about increased nuclear segments in your neutrophils.
Dr. Michael Engel
Dr. Michael Engel
Thank
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