Can a change in bowel habits mean colorectal cancer?

Yes. Persistent changes not correlating to your dietary or activity change should be worked up by your doctor. It does not diagnose colon cancer by itself but it is one of the symptoms.

Related Questions

Is irritable bowel syndrome a risk factor for developing colorectal cancer?

No. Ibs is not directly related to colorectal cancer, however, the symptoms of IBS can sometimes delay an evaluation for colorectal cancer. Read more...
No. Unless ibs diagnosis has been made incorrectly and your symptoms are actually a manifestation of early or precancerous bowel changes. If you have never had a recent colonosocpy, might consider it depending on your age and history. Read more...

10cm sigmoid tumor obstructing bowel, terminal colorectal cancer since 2010 extensive disease. Choice is stent or stoma please help not sure what to do?

Sorry . Sorry about the bad diagnosis. I would suggest that, at this point , if stent is possible go that route. A lot easier to recover from and ultimately, if disease is as bad as you say, it will be the same outcome. But don't have to recover from a big operation. Read more...
quality of life. 10 cm tumor stent will not give a permanent solution , will obstruct, will erode will bleed and give additional complications , if patient tolerates end colostmy , or simple loop transverse colostmy could be done under local , will have much better quality of life. Read more...

Having surgery for colorectal cancer? How much of the colon does the doctor take out? Will I have normal bowel function after?

You . You have to know what part of teh colon its going to take out. Its the rigth side will be almost normal may have alittle od los bowel in the firts 3 months. Its the left will be loss for 6 months but only in consistence. Its the rectum may change you ability of sensation, consistency and frequency. Read more...
Depends on location. Stage, size and location of the tumor determine how much colon and therefore how much impact on your bowel function you will experience. Read more...
Depends on location. Colon cancer is usually treated with wide removal of the segment of colon involved along with the lymph nodes draining that segment. The ends of the remaining intestine are reattached with staples or sutures. Bowel function is usually altered minimally unless there is more than one cancer and the entire colon is removed and sewn to the rectum. In that case, you might have frequent bms. Read more...

Colorectal cancer surgery and colostomy? Why does the doctor have to do a colostomy as part of colorectal cancer surgery? What is it exactly (a hole in my abdomen?) and how long will I have it?

Some . Some ostomies are for ever and other temporary. For low rectal cancer a temporary may be use to proted the new conection alowed to be healthy.If the cancer is to low involving the muscle to control the stool a penmanented ostomy is need. Yes a stoma is a open in you abdomen that alowwed a small portion of teh bowel to come out and it is cover by a ostomy bag. Read more...
Not . Not all colorectal cancer surgeries requires a colostomy. A colostomy is more often needed during an emergency operation (when there is no time to clean the bowel properly before the operation), like perforation or obstruction of the bowel caused by the tumor, that can create contamination and infections inside the abdomen. In those conditions putting the bowel together could be very risky and lead to failure of the operation, and doing a colostomy would help to control the contamination and prevent further infection. Commonly, after four to six weeks it is then safe to put the bowel together. On the other hand, if a colorectal cancer is detected in an early stage and no emergency situations are present, the bowel can be prepared properly and put together with less chances of having a complication. However, even in ideal conditions, some times the surgeon can find situations during the surgery which are concerning for possible complications (like poor blood supply to the bowel) and a temporary colostomy is performed to protect the bowel connection and let it heal safely without the passage of stool. Finally, some colostomies are permanent, depending on the location, the size, or the extension of the tumor to other organs. Read more...