10 doctors weighed in:
What pain relief is available for shingles that doesn't involve sleepiness?
10 doctors weighed in

Dr. Joel Gallant
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease
6 doctors agree
In brief: Topical therapy
Most of the oral medications used to treat shingles pain are sedating.
However, there are topical treatments (applied to skin) such as Lidocaine patches or gel, or capsacin cream (zostrix), a chili-derived substance that stings at first, but later deadens the nerve endings.

In brief: Topical therapy
Most of the oral medications used to treat shingles pain are sedating.
However, there are topical treatments (applied to skin) such as Lidocaine patches or gel, or capsacin cream (zostrix), a chili-derived substance that stings at first, but later deadens the nerve endings.
Dr. Joel Gallant
Dr. Joel Gallant
Thank
1 comment
Dr. William Newton
If topical treatments are not effective and pain is poorly controlled, the pain can be treat with nerve blocks (injections) that target the specific nerve that was the source of the shingles outbreak. I would recommend topical and oral medications prior to injection therapy as a conservative step.
Dr. Ron Jones
Family Medicine
4 doctors agree
In brief: Depends on Location
In some cases, interventional pain procedures such as nerve bocks may help.
Other drugs which modifies the nerve membrane may help (lyrica, neurontin, (gabapentin) keppra). Some of the tri-cyclic antidepressant are used to help bock pain pathways from the nerve to the brain. These meds may or may not cause drowsiness. I also agree with the other doctor who answered this question.

In brief: Depends on Location
In some cases, interventional pain procedures such as nerve bocks may help.
Other drugs which modifies the nerve membrane may help (lyrica, neurontin, (gabapentin) keppra). Some of the tri-cyclic antidepressant are used to help bock pain pathways from the nerve to the brain. These meds may or may not cause drowsiness. I also agree with the other doctor who answered this question.
Dr. Ron Jones
Dr. Ron Jones
Thank
Dr. Mehul Desai
Pain Management
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Topical agents
There are topical agents (gels, ointments, creams) such as capsacin and lidocine as well as other formulations that do not typically cause sedation.

In brief: Topical agents
There are topical agents (gels, ointments, creams) such as capsacin and lidocine as well as other formulations that do not typically cause sedation.
Dr. Mehul Desai
Dr. Mehul Desai
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Vicken Poochikian
Board Certified, Internal Medicine
38 years in practice
2M people helped
Continue
107,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors