Can having hemolytic anemia stop me from getting pregnant?

No. The oxygen carrying capacity of your blood, which is what anemia affects, does not affect fertility. However, depending upon how profound your anemia, it may make the pregnancy very difficult and risky. I would definitely correct the anemia before conception and remain in the care of your hematologist to maintain normal hemoglobin levels throughout your pregnancy.
No it won't.... If you're trying to get pregnant, i would work with your doctor to diagnose and treat the underlying cause of the hemolysis and the correct the anemia before trying to conceive. Pregnant women often develop a dilution all anemia, and given the demands of the fetus for oxygen during pregnancy, you and your child face additional challenges when the anemia is exacerbated. Good luck to you.

Related Questions

If a girl having autoimmune hemolytic anemia n on steroids n azathioprin what she should do to get pregnant n have healthy baby?

Hi risk pregnancy. Both drugs you are on are risky with pregnancy, you need to work closely with your hematologist and your obstetrician if you get pregnant to select drugs that better suit your condition and tell you the right time for conception, wish you wellness. Read more...
Avoid pregnancy. You should avoid pregnancy until after this process/treatment is over. The early embryonic phase of pregnancy is quite sensitive to the toxic effects and pregnancy loss or fetal injury would be quite possible. Read more...

A case of immune hemolytic anemia - chances of becoming pregnant? Care during pregnancy

Should be able to. Having a hemolytic anemia should not affect the ability to get pregnant. However, your hematologist will need to monitor your blood closely. May need extra folic acid. Hope this helps. Read more...

Are you familiar with autoimmune hemolytic anemia? How to people get it?

It's complicated. Short answer- the immune system comes to believe that your red cells are not yours and need to be removed from your body. It does this by making antibodies against the red cells and thus shortens their life-span. This results in anemia and symptoms such as tiredness, fatigue and sometimes jaundice. Aiha is not contagious. Read more...
Many causes. Certain drugs, certain infections. Also autoimmune diseases (lupus, rheumatoid). Also certain malignancies (leukemia, lymphoma). Can also be common after stem cell transplants. Read more...

Can a person with hemolytic anemia donate blood?

Unwise. If you have hemolytic anemia, you probably need to keep all the blood cells you've got! there are many different causes for hemolytic anemia. Check with your local red cross to find out if you qualify. Read more...
Usually No. Causes of hemolytic anemia include inherited metabolism or cell membrane disorders and acquired, e.G from antibodies. In either case the average survival of the red cells is shortened, sometimes severely and using such rbcs for transfusion would subject the recipient to more rapid loss of the transfused cells than is desirable, hence we do not use such donor sources. Read more...

Can Hemorrhagic gastritis precipitate hemolytic anemia.

Yes. You have to figure out why you are bleeding into your stomach and if there are any other places where you are bleeding and why and if you are making sufficient replacement blood and if not why not. This can be orchestrated, at least at first by your doc, and if things get really messy by a hematologist. Good luck! Read more...

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is what sort of symptoms or problems?

Tiredness. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia (aiha) red cells get broken open due to destruction by antibodies which attach to the red cell. This leads to anemia and fatigue, tiredness, and sometimes yellow eyes (scleral icterus) and yellow skin (jaundice). Read more...

Idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia - what are the chances of dying?

Depends on the cause. The chances of dying will depend on the cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. It can be caused by different things- from drug related- to rheumatoid problems, to malignancy -such as lymphoma, leukemia etc. Read more...
Uncommon. . This would be very uncommon. But it can happen. Definitely take the prescribed medicine and follow up with your doctor regularly. Read more...