In what way does ethylene glycol cause hemolysis?

Least of troubles. Ethylene glycol causes death by acidfying the body and producing crystals in the brain and kidney; there are problem direct toxic effects on some of the metabolic pathways as well. Hemolysis, if it occurs, is the least of these patients' problems. This question appears elsewhere and i wonder if some misguided teacher is asking it. Good luck.
Does not. At least not in humans. Ethylene glycol is metabolized to a number of toxic compounds that can damage kidney, brain and heart. In animals particularly mice one of these damages red blood cells and causes hemolysis, but for some reason this is very rare in humans. Apparently the human red blood cell is relatively resistant to that particular injury. Still the other toxicities remain.

Related Questions

Ethylene glycol poisoning - is that only from antifreeze?

No, but that is the. Most common source. Other sources are brake fluids, acrylic paints, primer and even shoe polish. But because the antifreeze tastes sweet and the others don't, it poses the greatest risk to pets and children. Read more...

What is the difference between propylene glycol and ethylene glycol?

The "ol" on the ends. Basically means that both compounds are alcohols. But there are many, many alcohols that are used in various products. The more dangerous of the 2 is the ethylene glycol which is found in antifreeze and a number of other products. Read more...

Treating ethylene glycol poisoning with alcohol - how does that work?

Saturation of the. Enzyme (alcohol dehydrogenase) that breaks down the ethylene gycol into it's more toxic metabolites. Read more...
Ethylene glycol. Is broken down into very toxic metabolites by alcohol dehydrogenase. The idea is to saturate the enzyme with alcohol so that none is available to break down the ehtylene glycol. Read more...

I've heard that you can treat ethylene glycol poisoning with alcohol. Is this true?

Yes, if early. Ethylene glycol is broken down by alcohol dehydrogenase into toxic metabolites. Once that happens, alcohol won't work. The idea is that the alcohol will take up all the available alcohol dehydrogenase available and stop it from metabolizing the ethylene glycol into it's more toxic metabolites. Read more...

I have heard that you can treat ethylene glycol poisoning with alcohol. Is this myth or fact?

Fact. Alcohol is the traditional treatment for ethylene glycol poisoning; it is rarely used anymore because there are safer alternatives. There are still no good alternatives. If you drink ethylene glycol you will be sorry. Read more...