Related Questions

How do I know if I have chicken pox or a really bad allergic reaction?

They are different. Chickenpox usually has a few days of cold like symptoms and fever before breaking out in spots...That look like flea bites then blisters then scabs. To diagnose it there typically have to be spots in all three stages. Allergic reactions can be hives or runny eyes, nose... Read more...

I just noticed there are small red dots all over my body, can't be chicken pox, already had it, no itch, and just appeared, Is it an allergic reaction?

Possibly allergic. Chicken pox usually causes tiny blisters, initially just a few. Second cases of chicken pox are NOT unusual. The description of your lesions makes the disease unlikely. Other viral disease, particularly in summer are a possibility. Allergic reactions usually itch; a drug reaction would be another possibility. If the rash does not resolve within a few days, see your primary care physician. Read more...

Should I worry if my baby had a bad reaction to his last chicken pox shot?

Depends. Most reactions would not prevent getting the second dose, but a severe life threatening reaction would make it unreasonable to repeat the vaccine. Read more...
No,Worrying not good. First of all worrying is contraindicated--that's what your health team is available for. Use the team to discuss what happened so that appropriate steps can be taken to properly evaluate the situation and make recommendations for the benefit of the baby and the parents. Secondly, if an allergic reaction to a previous vaccine or to some of the co-ingredients occurs, the series will be stopped. Read more...
Depends. There was a period after they combined the MMR with the varicella vaccine that we saw an increase if high fever reactions with the combined vaccine that wasn't seen when we gave the MMR and the v in different sites on the same day. It appeared only to affect the 1yr not the 4yr dose. I no longer offer the mmrv as a first dose to be sure. The kids still need the second dose. Read more...
Usually NO. It depends upon what the reaction was. Fussiness, fever, or soreness are aggravating, but not overly dangerous. An anaphylactic (severe allergic) or severe neurological reaction may be the only reasons not to immunize again. Discuss with your doctor. Read more...

My 12yr old son has chicken pox. On applying calomine lotion, he has fainted twice? Is this an allergic reaction or should I be worried?

Chickenpox. Fainting would be an unusual reaction as far as an allergy. If the calamine being applied is very painful that can happen. I'd recommend a call or visit to your doctor to get more details. Can also be related to being sicker with the chicken pox. Read more...

How do I know if what my child has is chicken pox or an allergic reaction to amoxicillin? She finished treatment 3 days ago and spots barely appeared

Likely reaction. Rash from amoxicillin is not uncommon especially when used in a viral infection. This is thought to be mediated by lymphocytes and not the IgE antibody associated with the typical drug allergy. Chickenpox is usually associated with blisters . However avoid all penicillin type drug until it has been cleared by an allergist. Read more...
Rash. The 2 rashes are very different. The rash with chickenpox generally erupts initially on the chest. They start off as red spots in clusters that form blisters with little indentations. An allergic rash looks more like hives and can also be a virus. Hives look like welts and move around. They are both itchy. A picture for your doctor may be helpful. All the best. Read more...
Different rashes. Cpx presents as an evolving spot that starts coming out around the neck before progressing throughout the body. It is best described as a dew drop on a pink rose petal that bursts dries in a day. They come out in clusters for days. Amoxicillin produces either raised hives (early) or a purplish flat spot under the skin.(late rash) Some liken them to tiny clovers. Read more...

My son had an allergic reaction to the first dose of the chicken pox vaccination what should I do for the second dos he had a very bad case of the hives after receiving the first dose of the chicken pox vaccination

Your . Your son can have a blood test called a "varicella titer" that will show whether he has developed enough immunity to the chicken pox with the first dose to forgo the second shot. 85% chance that this is the case. If he has not, you may want to discuss the risks and benefits with your child's doctor or with an allergist to come up with a safe and effective plan. Legal disclaimer: I am providing this general and basic information as a public service and my response to this question does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. For any additional information, advice, or specific concerns, please speak with your own physician. The information provided is current as of the date of the answer entry. Read more...
See an allergist. An allergist can give the vaccine in slowly increasing doses, will you and your son are in clinic, until the full dose is given but in a slower and safer manner. Plan on spending about 3 hours at the allergists office. Read more...

I don't know if this rash developed over a 3 day period is an allergic reaction, or could be shingles, or even another type virus. I have never had chicken pox as a child, I confirmed this with my mom?

Need some info. Many people may have chicken pox exposure and not know; shingles is painful. It spreads in a distict dermatome, or nerve distribution of the skin. Is it all over the body? Any recent new soap or products? Were you ill? There are many types of rashes. Some are a reflection of a systemic ilnesss, some are viral, some bacterial, some are allergy. Hydrocortisone cream with fungal cream may b gd strt. Read more...
Get it checked. Trying to diagnose a rash by phone or email is the most frustrating thing in the world. It could be all those things you mentioned, a post viral rash, a contact irritation, or even a topical staph infection. A doc can give you an immediate and accurate answer as to what it is, and what to do for it. Read more...