How common is the inherited persistence of fetal hemoglobin?

Difficult to measure. This is difficult to measure because in most people with inherited persistence of fetal hemoglobin are entirely asymptomatic. However, population studies have shown that about 10% of the population has been seen to have some persistence of fetal hemoglobin but in varying levels (from 0.8% of cells containing the fetal hemoglobin up to about 10% fetal hemoglobin levels).
Not common. I do not know the exact percentages and I am not a pediatric hematologist, but it is not common.

Related Questions

What is the definition or description of: fetal hemoglobin?

Hb F. Is the main hemoglobin that transport oxygen in the fetus during the last seven months of development in the uterus and in the newborn until roughly 6 months old. , fetal hemoglobin is able to bind oxygen with greater affinity than the adult hemoglobin, giving the developing fetus better access to oxygen from the mother's bloodstream. Read more...

What are the risks for the patient in undergoing a fetal hemoglobin test?

Fetal Hemoglobin. Some patients have a high level of fetal hemoglobin, for a number of potential reasons. The fetal hemoglobin does not cause any problem, but some blood diseases that are important to know, and potentially treat, such as sickle cell anemia, are important. The hemoglobin electrophoresis, the test for most of these issues, will help the hematologist if there is a problem and needs treatment. Read more...
Blood test. This is just a blood test. The risks are the same for any blood testing, such as bruising and the needle site. Read more...

I have elevated levels of fetal hemoglobin. What can cause this? I am not pregnant. Does it point to a disorder?

Not necessarily. Elevated fetal hemoglobin may represent what is known as persistence of fetal hemoglobin. It would be helpful to know what the percentages of various hemoglobins are in your electrophoresis, This may be normal for YOU or it could represent a topic which needs investigation. Please speak to your doctor. Good luck! Read more...